September Ends : A Photo Blog

Blogging Diversion

As I have not seen a film to review in the past few weeks I offer an alternative.
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Great Patrick Street
Here are some of the photographs I’ve taken in and around September.  Not necessarily in this year and also revisited and manipulated at times to draw out the hidden art.
The end game as UUsee it.
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The end game as UU see it.       Here is what Rankin said about his photography lately.

My versions of reaching into those places you see as touching you


Culture Night : Step into the dark. Part 1


Culture Night : Step into the dark. Part 2.

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Vanishing                                                     In the afternoon

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A smile from Poland

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Shouting or silence?  Great Patrick Street.  Paddy McCann installation.

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Tamar Walk wrapped.  C.S. Lewis.

Julie                                                      Anon

 

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Clonard

Eileen in disguise

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Friar’s Graveyard Belfast

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All Souls Belfast

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Riddel’s Warehouse Belfast

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Please check all rooms are unoccupied and switch off all appliances and lights removing plugs from sockets and ensuring all doors are closed and locked where appropriate.  Thank you for your attention.

 

John Graham

28 September 2017

Belfast

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Insyriated : A Film Review


Insyriated

Director. Philippe Van Leeuw, Written by Philippe Van Leeuw.

Cast. Hiam Abbass as Oum Yazan (no birth name), Diamand Bou Abboud as Halima, Juliette Navis as Delhani, Mohsen Abbas as Abou Monzer, Moustapha Al Kar as Samir, Alissar Kaghadou as Yara, Ninar Halabi as Aliya, Mohammad Jihad as Sleik Yazan, Elias Khatter as Karim, Husam Chadat as Man 1.

Music by Jean-Luc Fafchamps. Cinematography by Virginie Surdej. Film Editing by Gladys Joujou. First Assistant Director, Jean-François Ravagnan.

Producers: Guillaume Malandrin, Serge Zeitoun. Co-producers: Tomas Leyers, Pierre Sarraf.

Duration 1hr 25mins. Country, Belgium. Language, Arabic. English subtitles. Certificate 18.

War in a day.

This is a social political drama which claustrophobically is set in an apartment building, in the war torn Syrian capital Damascus, surrounded with the sounds of war. Occupying the fourth floor of the building is matriarch Oum Yazan played superbly by Hiam Abbass, a very well known Israeli/Palestinian actress whose films include Lemon Tree (2008) Amreeka (2009) The Visitor (2008) and Inheritance (2012). She is despite the war danger all around her, is not for moving. Having found a home it is unconscionable she should give up what has become her family life. Heading the cast she and Juliette Navis and Diamand Bou Abboud are joined by the remainder of the cast, real Syrian refugees who’d never acted before so all the child are on a formidable journey in many different ways.
Cinematographer turned director Phillipe Van Leeuw deals – again, with a stark war situation having previously delivered an equally horrific film; that is a warning already, set in the Rwanda genocide – The Day God Went Away. Like this film it concerns itself with the humanity.   He avoids the politics and us and them scenarios but deals with the war’s impact and people’s mobility, immobility.  This is filmed in Lebanon.  Undoubtedly it is a difficult watch.  Unforgiving in its telling and though slightly overdoes it on occasion, it never underestimates the dreadful negative power of violence underpinning not just individuals but nations.  His use of a hand held camera is a very effective tool in the confines of the apartment and it pulls you in almost as an involuntary observer.  To the sounds continuing outside, rapid fire machine guns, sniper fire, overhead missiles flight, bombings, sirens, explosions, you react and every tension is felt.  Never are the politics of a domestic civil war and proxy international war any part of the message except the axiomatic one of wars never having solutions with these stories part of the telling.

Our interior lives.

For a film to confine itself to the interior world of an apartment it immediate sets up the people within it to interact, by each revealing increment, individual nuances of the characters own place in this Damascus oppressive and stifling setting.  Every character is neatly framed in their willingness or stoicism acceptance of this strange and rapidly altering unstable place.  The children too exhibit fear and confusion of what it means as a part of their lives. All compartmentise their lives within this space.
Seemingly assured and on the other hand, equally concealing her terror, matriarch Oum Yazan takes the audience into the screen.  Each movement becomes, in the hand held direction of the camera, something tangible and present.  We enter the bedroom to be introduced to a sleeping Samir played by Moustapha Al Kar, with crouched leaning back against the bed a softly reflective Halima whose face is like a Botticelli. Played by Beirut born Diamand Abou Abboud, with Void (2013) Stable Unstable (2013) and Doukhan bila nar (2008) on her roster as well as being a writer, she is a mother with turmoil ravaging her thoughts.  The family Samir, Halima and baby son have flight on their minds.   Her expressions draw you into the tragedy of the situation and her part is pivotal with a life changing act following on from another hidden horror.

This sense of insular tense insecurity grows as the fellow occupants of the apartment join the story.  Oum’s daughters Yara (Alissar Kaghadou) and Aliya (Ninar Halabi), a son Yazan (Mohammad Jihad Sleik), her father-in-law Mustafa (Mohsen Abbas), and their maid Delhani (Juliette Navis).  Then there is the family mentioned above, Halima (Diamand Abou Abboud), Selim (Moustapha Al Kar), and their newborn child who have come down from a floor above and Yara’s boyfriend, Kareem (Elias Khatter), child after child is introduced.  The children being non-actors perform extraordinarily and it occurs to you that this is the common currency of their lives, being Refugees now in Jordan. Then the cast absorbs you completely with their story.

This film, as reviewer MK has already quickly noticed, bears a similarity to one of my favourite films of the recent year gone, Under the Shadow. Both are set in an interior World. There is horror in both. There is a common deception and an inability to deal with issues among people and the terror is not held back by withholding truth. People deceive even when they are relied on to be honest.  Coming to dilemma early on, Oum Yazan is confronted with choice and it is a real one with her being told something witnessed by the maid Dalhani.  I think it is a valid choice given the regard for their safety and time needed to take in the enormity of the incident.  Some others record it differently.  Their choice and both valid as neither of us will have had that choice to make.
The burden of knowing is torturous and the tension is felt unbearable within the film.

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Humanitarian chains.

The humanitarian dilemma faced in the place, the apartment building all would call their home, begins to loose its sense of permanence and stable routine has now vanished on the will of others which imperils this group with fate no longer determined by them but by the external and the fragility of living in a war torn conflict zone.  World power struggles are on their street and huge resources of phenomenal destructive war weaponry is the reality just outside their walls. Even weaponry which is banned from conflict use is in being deployed. The bare rule making and war baiting has no longer any place or role. Outside their home, in its streets, it is incandescent with fury and the complete failure of mankind to reconcile or recoil from violent means of governance.  Liberty, equalitarianism is nowhere to be found.

Stark reality.
When the rooms were the film takes place within one day, are seen they too tell a story. Syrian, Arabic decor is never primary in flour and this is part of the design in this film. It puts across colour as intensity removed. Blues, Yellows, Greens, Reds, each soulfully reflective of nature. There are the washed walls which are lightly colour and not dark heavy boundaries. The curtains too are exquisitely patterned in Arabic sometimes modernist interpretations of ancient patterns. In the old kitchen the tall tiled splash back wall tiles are circles and swirls as in micro form natures patterns disclose under the micro scope. This is the home Oum fashions in a decorous respectful history for herself and her children. She looks into the horizontal oval of the bathroom mirror and Syrian life looks back with modernity ranged across the shelf under with a collection of multi colored toothbrushes and the usual soap, shavers, milieu of homes anywhere in the ‘developed world. The bombs and machine gun fire provide a symphony from the devil.  All the rooms have wall hangings. In the room Grandfather sits, the acquired and steadfastly defended ante-room off the Dining Room, he diagonally faces the world from behind the corner of a small square table around which are four chairs. It is strange initially to see him not in a comfortable chair but his chosen spot is too a symbol of the insecurity in everyone’s minds.

Arranged along the wall facing towards the open arch to the Dining Room is a vast collection of Books arranged up to the ceiling. On the wall lithograph black and white pictures, prints possibly, illustrating the Syrian mind.  One is of a pair squatting on the ground in an exterior as if they have stopped on a journey. Something of the Bedouin about it. They look at the centre and above it is and behind is a bird with other smaller birds in flight above. Another has a long mountainous valley with a dark side on one side and slightly lighter on the other as what appear to people walking away through this valley perhaps to an unknown place. There in a few prints you have fixed society, harmony and pressing on. A red rug is hung on another wall and around the Dining Room are family photographs carefully arranged in decorative frames on fine furniture. Then there is a centrepiece on which Oum in a scene displays a longing and almost listens to its pro memora for its advice. A moment which has similarity to a scene in the aforementioned Under the Shadow. The Dining table is a huge eight seater mahogany or walnut split highly polished table with all the matching seats. In prime position as a focal point of the held traditions Oum holds tight to, it is providing solace and assurance of identity, manifest in a continuity of history now in the throes of alteration which might be irretrievable. This is something everyone can relate to and is very cleverly used as a cinematic device of profound significance.
What passes for modern.
In contrast to the interior so far described there comes the hallway decoration which lifts itself into the twentieth century uncompromisingly with on one wall a Warhol type red lithoprint of possibly Blueswoman Janis Joplin. A far more impactive design carefully chosen by the imaginative Phillipe Van Leeuw asserting his wide ranging skills is in the room where the family from above are given. It is a child’s bedroom given over to the young family. On its walls are a Dave Matthews Band Psychedelic band poster.  Above the bed are arranged Small white discs like linking stars. Most imaginative, as we see when we look at a distraught Halima holding her cherished baby, are two space posters. On the left is a spacecraft launch looking like the USA, ballistic missile propelled Voyager, with alongside it a Russian equivalent.  Hugely implying hope and unknown destiny and a race between nations for greater status and I think contextually it has a shocking convergence on screen, within the film, with the image collecting narratives and spilling them out for our digestion.   A pretty remarkable but simply resonance for us and of the Directors overall intent.

Supercharge tension.
Only occasionally moments of terror and their pace seem wrong. When it is mentally rushing scenes occasionally lack the consistent pace and fall flat or flow in the wrong way. One which is fully on pace and very intense is the treatment of a core brutal act of violence which has the horror of mindless acts enter the flat itself. There is a climb towards a horrific attack inside the apartment which has a deeply impacting very brutal effect on the group. With the outside militants having the home in brutal fashion one young family member goes outside, as another had done in the beginning, to take on the courageous act which puts him in the same danger. He sees it as his duty and bravery is implicit through the whole ensemble facing down entrapment.  For a young person this is testimony to him of the proximity of war and the need to survive.  We see how all symbols of war, conscripted ancient allies have been corrupted unimaginably and it puts forward too the very present act of mans suppression of woman in search of power and control which these infidels see as a medusas head or a hydra of myths of Andromeda and the space allusion again used as an allegory which is a departure from God.
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Infidels
Infidels, they are known in the Muslim faith as kaffirs have contested meaning.  Both, according to my own beliefs, signify someone who lacks all and any faith Christian, Muslim or other.  For faith is to have belief in the simple message of the Word a God the Messiah, a Prophet or messenger of religion found in acceptance to a higher dominion one no one has complete knowledge or control of.   Fundamentally this places the infidel as someone who rejects all dominions of faith. It is not exclusive to one religion or another but is a part of the human flaws which religious beliefs seek to offset and overcome through faith.
Using these terms as absolute is not adequate either. It seems Infidels themselves appropriate rejection and not inclusion as a belief to suit their own worldly means. To me an Infidel is a person who disbelieves or doubts a particular theory, belief, creed, and other extensions of the spiritual world and each belief form has within it detractors and ‘infidels’. This film puts across a faith in humanity despite the infidels war on people’s souls right outside and visits their home. Some religions have not found in their own faith enough to appeal to reconcile differences and project the ‘love thy neighbour’ credo. This is through perhaps division and separateness from a core simplicity. The Word if you like.
There are no shortage of views on this fundamental disconnection with the intrinsic human core of goodness. One we see in its various forms in Insyriated. The distractions have been overwhelming across the millennia and this film places another fine contemporaneous view which is extremely explicit in its focus on the humanity trapped inside and by false projections brutalisng all humanity.

Here are some other words I revisited lately. These words are recalled Well, God is in his heaven And we all want what’s his, But power and greed and corruptible seed Seem to be all what there is. Some might remember it is Bob Dylan’s Blind Willie McTell describing for me the void, absence of common sense and covers and crosses boundaries will remaining within the pain. The peril of the people is even more tragic.

Conclusion ####4

For some the title will appear uninformative and it is a strange choice especially as the European Director (Belgian) must have a handle on what is impactive.

        

Insyriated is perhaps a Syrian translation ongoing and a portrayal of interventions uncalled for and unwelcome. More than unwelcome the are faced with a tyrannical regime and a counterinsurgency with multiple heads and aims. Captured in a domestic vice with war raging all around in one day we follow the outcomes as they change within seconds facing further and further brutalisation of their existence. The very connections with Bedoiun nomadic lives are kept fast as the film takes care and very vividly drawn us into its claustrophobic world which gathers and grows ever menacing and disturbing through events unfolding before our eyes. We are a the eyes of an observer who is in the direction almost within the rooms where the scenarios unfold.  Each room tells a part of the story and the apartment is sizable enough for scenes and people to separate and be alone with their knowledge. Each of the children play a great part in seeing as we do things as they contrast with their world expectations. The hand held camera is a device which grips us and won’t let go of the escalating and worsening fate. As invisible characters our eyes are intimately gathering and making comparisons and judgements based on our own views. The nerves bristle and sudden changes impress on the viewer and force reactions which are in the moment as you place yourself inside it albeit avoiding the consequences in others harms way.

There will be few films to match this dramatic gripping treatment of a conflict we know little of. Aleppo is another place and where another entirely different but genocidal War is being carried out while other detached twin warfares carry on in other cities and settled rural communities. Documentaries and heavily edited news reporting are often the only means of being witnesses to the wide arena of war zones. This film takes us away from the politics and culturally fights a battle for humanity with the brave and superb acting of people whose investment in the film is over and above anything you see on a regular basis. The actors have invested themselves in this and it is clearly something which they care for with passion. There is one scene where they retreat to the kitchen which is the ‘safest’ refuge on hearing explosions are close by. The camera remains still and the rooms atmosphere pours out in the movements and reactions of individuals as their movements shift in harmony and with individual anxiety. It is like looking into a Biblical painting as it is intensely absorbing. One of the occasions when they pause and wait and we watch flabbergasted, shocked and overcome along with them. Disbelieving and suppressing the truth of the reality happening everywhere.

John Graham

14 September 2017

Belfast

Insyriated will screen at QFT from 15th September 2017 until 21st September 2017.

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God’s Own Country : A Film Review


God’s Own Country 

Directed by Francis Lee. Produced by Manon Ardisson, Anna Duffield, Diarmid Scrimshaw,  Jack Tarling.  Written by Francis Lee. Cast . Josh O’Connor, Alec Secareanu, Ian Hart, Gemma Jones.  Cinematography Joshua James Richards.  Edited by Chris Wyatt.  Production companies. Inflammable Films, Magic Bear Productions, Shudder Films. 1hr 45mins. Cert. 15.

Introduction

The BFI sponsored Gods Own Country provides this introduction – Both post-gay and pre-Brexit, Francis Lee’s debut feature is anything but a straightforward coming-out tale. Instead it’s an eerily beautiful love story between two men and the wild Yorkshire landscape. The film is partly based on writer and director Lee’s own life, where he also had to make a decision to either stay and work on his family’s farm, or whether to go off to drama school.

Basis

Francis Lees first feature film is a portrait of contemporary life in the Pennines for a family beset with troubles keeping their small farm going. Johnny Saxby played with grim determination, by a frequently sullen Josh O’Connor has the task of taking on his fathers chores and running the isolated hill top farm above the city of Bradford in its foothills. Keithley is in the civic boundaries of Bradford yet is a generation or two away from the complexities of urbanity and the arduous task of taking on a farms relentless time consuming running.


Ponderous Pennines

Endless labour and maintenance sits badly with John. He is nevertheless conscious of the help needed, as his father Martin played with sturdy robust effectiveness by Ian Hart, is in recovery from a stroke and is unable to walk without the aid of crutches.   His grandmother who runs the house is the resolute Gemma Jones making up a strong cast who are joined by the fourth pillar of the film, Romanian worker Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu) a seasonal worker. They have put out requests for assistance on the farm and his was the only reply.
From the beginning this film is framed simply around the central activities of the locality familiar to rural people and the land is suitable only for sheep grazing and rearing and the keep of some heifers.  They are few and they are equally on a limited mission to produce the occasional calf.   The work is centred on the sheep flock and the season is spring when plenty of work is needed. Day and night.

Labour

Johnny is seen in the initial stages as this forlorn character who is capable and knowing, in the labours and tasks which his father daily repeats.  Martin still in charge, puts across his replayed management regardless of the wishes of a Johnny whose job is lonely and unsatisfying.  The forlorn part of him sees no evidence of a future as the daily grind is unremitting.   Also clear from the beginning is his waywardness and mental need for company and he embarks on satisfying his wants by having gay sex with a local who offers him this release which he uses as a separate but fraught fulfilment.  It is contrasting with his bi-sexual failings with a young woman who has briefly returned from College and shows his anxiety at not being able to construct what might have been, signalled only, an alternative relationship of mutual satisfaction.  He rails against this young brief returnee who all too clearly puts in place his fixity.   He cannot and will not let down either his father or Grandmother and sees the road ahead as a tough and daunting reality which he must endure.


The predicament is played out extremely sensitively to show the sensitivity of commitment, to severance,  with what is – the other member of the cast I failed to mention – Gods own Country – and the beautiful countrysid.  It has barely altered rugged stones hill as grasslands climbing above the tungsten lights and sodium arcs other city of Bradford below.  It venerates both the city and the locality of the farm in essence placing town against country in the narrative.

Land aplenty –  another country

Gheorghe Is the incomer and Johnny is in need of his assistance big time.  The work is gathering pace with work on fences, stone walls tumbled, feeding, heifers as well as sheep in the throes of birthing new born calves and lambs.  Gheorghe is a stronger and more mentally attuned to the agricultural labours needed around him.  That quickly becomes apparent this is something of a salvation for Gheorghe as it takes him back to the farming he grew up with.  He comes from a country which has a greater wealth of agricultural land and is capable of feeding a large part of Europe but is is as he tells John, a Dead Country. Despite the Romanians having kept hold of a tough and contested country and past the days where the Romanians, because of some of their nation’s population being nomadic, denying them the rights of ‘landowners’ – the landgrabbers exploiting the displaced as well as the soil.


Education and self definition via. Religious or Cultural establishment was the legacy brought up to and into the 21st century. The land in Romania is unlike any other but migration has destroyed that country after fascist leaders and dictatorial penance brought on by countries neighbouring Romania continuing the explorations and failing to restore a country in turmoil from generations of internal torture and wilful suppression. The EU stood and watched and acted very slowly and inadequately which outcomes now confirm all too evidently.


Ways of living 

Gheorghe Represents another way of doing things and he is in some harmony with this Pennine landscape as it reminds him of the lost opportunities fixed in his mind. Every task is fairly routinely known for him to manage as a farmer should and as many hands make light of work he brings a sense of comfort. John is drawn into exploring the world of Gheorghe and in a central part of the film they converge as both creatures needing each other’s form of contact. They become explicitly intimate and as with earlier scenes they engage in sexual acts which are filmed as escalating bonding.

With this central bonding taking place on the hills in the lambing season and the work interrupting their figuring out what their relationship means to each, the film tries to boil it down in the simplest terms and follows actions as each work away separately and in unison.


This period in which their friendship moves from initial hostility and challenge to friendship and then intimate sexual acts is also a time when John is less in need of the alcohol which his frequent disabuse of has his father and Grandmother outraged and despairing of. He also begins to appreciate the nature and the location more though it’s far from clear what is to happen.
In the hills they are alone to develop their unbridled kinship. It is drawn from their resources and from emptiness and creates a bond which John finds unquenchable. The story is lifted into a soulful place which is matched by the physicality of their relationship.


Bonding alters things

When they return after many days away on the hills living rough in tumbledown stone buildings and only a ‘student staple’ for a diet, (some lager is labelled but no product placement takes place!) it is to a different atmosphere as the routine is shifted with the father Martin being less clear as to his son’s mood and detects its alteration. It is a film about challenges and family with compromises and uncertainties. Both men are at similar points in their lives and are in choices are appearing. Gheorghe Is more fatalistic while at the same time is optimistic. John has no direction in mind and sees only the family responsibility as his primary focus. The stakes rise and the choices are starkly addressed.

I have colour enhanced some of the photographs from the online screen source and trailer and this is a brighter visual than the one seen.

There are a limited number of scenes away from the dales but when it reaches the dales in the hill camp while they tend the lambing sheep and look around them there is a rough and ready state contrasted with the natural continuity provided by the seasonal changes. Though shot for springtime the weather is harsh and little sunlight reaches here.   It would have a brilliant resonance where it to carry on as a film into the ‘summer’ of a relationship as the fragile bond is seen in my mind as one which is left in the compass of things like an uncrossed border.  Though everyone can make up their own mind there is a limbo of thought involved.  There are shades of the family coming out narrative but again the backstory is unfleshed and comprises only the four principals.  Apart from those shades the colour of the film is dulled beyond recognition and there is no metaphorical brightness of contrasting emotions on view.  It is unfortunately meek and dull in colourist terms, which conflicts with the way the place and emotions might and could be envisaged.  It is fixed in the melodramatic depressing theme in all honesty.


Spatial wonder of colour

When it is played out the only seemingly permanent thing possibly to be drawn from it would appear to be the relationship of people in need of helping one another and their being no sole path nor right or wrong way of approaching things but to be capable of discerning what choices are bad ones and not to be reliant on expectations.  The other is the title provides, Gods own Country may seem a bit cliched as a title.   It probably is and no God fearing etc. Tolerance was contained within it – to the naked eye – but it revokes a lot of prerceptions people might have on how relationships form and what attachments are drawn to them. It is a naked attempt quite literally by the writer to have audience affected by what they see and to put down their judgements and not to place notions of – cliched rhetorical retorts – onto something which ought not to concern them while putting forward means to adjust. While it is something of a long drawn out film to make such a point given the meter of open discussion on same sex marriage or civil partnerships, it also seems it an axiomatic subject and deals with the formation of relationships from wherever they gather.

 

Conclusion ###3

The initial stages of the film are a shade dismal with the central figure, Johnny binge drinking, random sexual encounters and overstate the dynamic with some predictability on show.  The authenticity is only raised by the farming composite – in Gods own Country – as it feeds the narrative and the quad bike is a staple road trip type journey into that landscape. Johnny on the farm duties after being told like a schoolboy what his tasks were by a disabled and confined bitter father.  Bitterness rubbing shoulders.  Mud and trailers and binder twine.   There is a lot of shaking of hay later numerous sex scenes and they are sometimes overdrawn and I thought pointless in length and voyeuristic.  They are mixed in locality for variance but after the initial physical bonding they develop little conversation of what they initial thought of each other or about themselves as relationship of any type require. The dialogue is brusque flat Northern and abrupt as well as dulling ly avoiding the centrality of what’s meant behind the words.

The encounters do fill space and the unfolding dynamic is perhaps necessarily spoken through the intimacies.  There is an excellent eye for detail and the film was presumably able to get by with a limited budget and is not overstretching itself by being something of a cinematic juxtaposition of city versus rural visions and it seldom actually puts itself over as being of a lesson on England. It could in fact be anywhere. Montana. Utah. Austria. Romania. Spain. Shades of Brokeback Mountain perhaps.  With the reliance on all those places on patterns of living which are changing rapidly and old values are being supplanted.

The realism is a feature which has the characters develop with some surety in their story and it is believable in that regard. It is an odd set up though with an only son, no relatives, – a scene at which some might be expected is a no show – and the mother never mentioned is not a narrative enabler but a stumbling block perhaps. It is a commentary made, narrow ranged, very well acted and thoughtful film of interest to many quarters but it laboured for me and didn’t offer too many tokens of insightful oblique unique view warranting it’s greater exposure. It was great do to see the exchanges though between the generations and the opposites colliding.

And there are plenty of secrets here. Following his father’s stroke, Johnny Saxby (a terrific, stoically anguished performance from Josh O’Connor) has been forced to take over the daily running of the farm. Surveying his efforts with thin-lipped disapproval are his grandmother (Gemma Jones) and his dad (Ian Hart). With vowels as flat and hard as flagstones, they pass judgment on his efforts. It’s hard to say which weighs him down more – the responsibility or the massive chip on Johnny’s shoulder. To numb his dissatisfaction, he binge-drinks and engages in angry bouts of gay sex with strangers.
Then Romanian worker Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu) arrives to help out over the lambing season. Limpid-eyed and almost painfully handsome, his presence unnerves Johnny, who finds it hard to unpick the difference between aggression and attraction. Their first sexual encounter is all sweat and spit, dirt and urgency. But Gheorghe brings some of the tenderness he shows to the animals into what soon becomes a relationship fuelled by Pot Noodles and stolen moments. Through Gheorghe, Johnny can once again see the beauty in the land he had started to regard as a tomb.

John Graham

7 September 2017

Belfast

On at Queens Film Theatre from Friday 8 September through to and including Friday 21 September 2017.
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