L’Ennue & Red Sorghum : Film Meaning in Lockdown

L’ennui (boredom)

Film 1998

Lost in Paris

The lack of energy in a city renowned for its vitality is amazing even in the late nineties when this was made. The slow pace of Paris is contrasted with a frantic abusive controlling relationship with an older man “you can see a bed but not a personality” Cecilia (Sophie Guillemin tells Martin (Charles Berlin) as this is seen natural in a disarming drama of societies values and morals. It looks crude and ott with no good things on offer.

Moral – If your bored it’s your own fault!

Strange secrets

Mad and Bad

Martin is a mad philosopher behaving as a bully with fits of jealousy when he becomes infatuated with a young intelligent actress. Cecilia is making her skills work across her world. It doesn’t slow down their sexual appetites but intensifies it. A little death every time.

Empire review synopsis is almost perfect (later I raise some historical concerns) in its vision.

Self interest

From Empire Review this extract ‘As the philosopher who has almost eradicated sensibility from his life, Berling expertly combines curiosity, lust and despair as he loses control of his intellect. But it’s Sophie Guillemin who provides the truer portrayal, with a display of dispassionate adolescent volition that is almost capricious in its innocence.’ David Parkinson Empire 1998

Obsessions in different periods

There is also an observation of French films of this period being observed as obsessed with copulation.

It is what reviews ought to do and challenges through cinema self mockery the genius of our accepting art film as moral guidance while at the same time is obviously a dark morose triangle, at times voyueristic. It’s a surprise there is so much sex but souls are also bared. Also obvious is the lack of guile in the young woman who is confused and unable to reject the enabled freedom she is locked into.

This review https://www.empireonline.com/movies/reviews/lennui-review/

Conclusions

It’s a functional fast moving film with few surprises navigating an earlier time, and almost provides an obsession philosopher/psychiatrist R D Laing would love, as it becomes in mood a retreat to the streets where in the 19th and previous centuries a large part of the female population were forced into being sexual objects satiating a powerful male run society. Their is even a crudely placed appearance of that industry with unreal and contrite conclusions. It leaves the screen with Cedric Khans Cecilia lost.

The David Parkinson Empire Review has insightful parts though even it is caught in the sexual prominence the film uses. This for example, …..

‘Initially baffled by how such an unprepossessing kid could have enslaved so cultured a man, Martin is soon besotted with her, too.’ He passes on the ‘use’ the ‘cultured man’ has made of a vulnerable girl.

He also has habits of the time with this extract.

A Parisian professor becomes sexually enslaved by a monosyllabic teenager.

These words are vile and judgemental for any reviewer to summarise the complexity of youth.

David Parkinson arrives at the same rating

3###

Red Sorghum a story from 1919

The way this ancient story deals with love and betrothal is again with the women of principle young girl auctioned off by her family to a wealthy man nearly four decades her senior and he is riddled with leprosy.

Traditions

Opening scenes introduce us to the girl she travels enclosed in a red sedan with four bearers who lead by a paid bodyguard. They make the journey jolting her on her way and along with six singers pipers, are going through the red Sorghum fields. Tall reeds of corn stalks conceal the imported grains secrets. Wine is made from the gluten free Jowar grain.

The fields stretch beyond the horizon and huge blue skies dominate the curvature of the Qingshako province removed from the cities and relying on this highly nutritious food.

Twists of fate and government control shapes how they live.

Director Zhang Yimou on set

Plant with healing binding properties

Little wonder its benefits allow for some diversions. Rich in protein iron and copper, this gluten free grain has been known to play a crucial role in cellular function and repair. The rich quantity of potassium and phosphorous helps lower cholesterol and manage high blood pressure. Jowar grain is rich in fibre and hence should be part of your daily diet.

Sorghum field

A cup of jowar has 22 grams of protein.

Jowar has essential vitamins, antioxidants and minerals. It is loaded with good amounts of calcium, copper, zinc, phosphorous, potassium and cell-building B vitamins.

Red Red Wine

The young girl believes she is ill. The community tell her “Sorghum wine kills all germs”.

Red Sorghum wine becomes the source of goodness for the community as they revive the winery. The cooperative practices the rest of society lacks is found in abundance selflessly. It is out with the old and in with the new.

Zhang Yimou examines the future,

In a way as this film was made while the renewal of China and the course taken since, it forms revalue the optimism this period that had gone along with imperial imperfections that were to suppress the Chinese later.

Almost a replication of the revolution. The time China is now in as a fascist undemocratic is far removed from the filmmakers writers vision of the true meaning of Communism or his providing expression of what might be.

His vision as a filmmaker is within a culture devoid of a revolution, and he shows a community is basically only as far as the horizon and that’s all it need be and visitors would be neighbours not family.

Zhang Yimou sees the power structures in the world and shows us the character of the girl Little Nine becomes an equal in her new environment and circumstances. She comes with qualities unfamiliar to the men in the community. This is a rebirth not just of the cooperative and communism but a lesson in human values base and real.

Tiananmen Square

Known as a Fifth Generation Director, Zhang Yimou was seeing a wave of predetermining Maoism, that would follow the eventual defeat of the Japanese. The Fifth Generation he belonged to suffered from the forced outcomes that came from the Chinese tragic and inexcusable massacre in Tiananmen Square, of their own, among them student’s, women, elderly and children. I know I’ve seen the unaltered pictures in the Royal Destival Hall.

When this was made it won the Berlin Film Festival Award in 1988 one year before the wall came down. Did it inspire that long awaited act?

Won the Golden Bear at the 1988 Berlin International Film Festival.

Royal Festival Hall had extremely disturbing images of the massacre in 1989 on its first floor out of the usual public view, routes. Seen on the way to performance.

As Germany was to take down the wall thus became a symbol as Tiananmen Square symbolised with it’s bloodbath suppression the opposite direction China was heading.

Within the film there is the exploitation by a militia gangster element who know no morals and act as a barrier to the freedoms asserting themselves within the community. The Sangou are against liberty and intimidate by spoiling progress.As Angela Merkel planted her Eastern German feet in the liberal capitalist machinery of West Germany she ritualised the false premise of wealth gathering as the epitome of human endeavour.

Red Sorghum makes a story of nature’s abundant giving, when respected. Becoming a catalyst for harmony but the ceremony of seasons are trivialised by the love lorn former bodyguard who demolishs all goodness in a feature of brokenness. The triangle is of a young girl, her betrothal to a much older man, the uncirculated jealousy. Meanness from a the bodyguard initially paid to protect her is met by her rejection of his base and controlling ways.

Fixed

Just as L’Ennue was full of poor treatment of women this again goes into the barbed relationships routinely faced. French films had their sojourn in the ‘69 spawning of tales of revolution, wild ambition alongside female intuition were contests then. Here is another such battle, and a decade or so on the French have abandoned that for ‘the philosophers angst’ and a base treatment of women as this reflects the ‘eighteen mile hill’ high above the plains in China so a community in isolation is not safe from its own inherited demons. One brutality is followed by more and the red becomes a symbol of occupation, oppression and waste.

This story really concerns the imperialism of neighbours devouring hope. It’s as if the brutality is customised by race. Here the Japanese destroy thousands and show bitterness divides. The combination of evil and oppression is mirrored across red lines.

Zhang Yimou has as the Empire review link below – this interpretation – ‘The disease-ridden winery owner (to whom Jiu’er was exchanged for a mule) clearly represents the corrupt Ching dynasty that was toppled in 1911, while the emphasis on collective action suggests the nation’s predetermination for the Maoism that would triumph just five years after the vanquishing of the Japanese.’

Zhang Yimou

Making such a film debut with writing and concepts that are politically charged is astonishing when you consider the interrogation of an emerging China within a global context.

Author Hóng Gāoliáng Jiāzú; lit.: ‘red sorghum family’) is a Chinese language novel by Mo Yan. Published in 1986, it was Mo’s first novel and remains one of his best-known works.

Stunning scenery

There are times when the cinematography reverts to a tonal black. When silent compliance under a form of penitence or servitude is embarked on. The contrast are raw in ceremonial playing out of the forbearance, of their kin, like a stage drama. A dance in a non existent universe.

Conjuring tricks evoking thoughts like babettes feast are played out, or the last supper. The wine brought to the table as a cure for all ill. Another memorial is recalled.

In a local Church a wall ‘viamold’ sculpture by Rosamund Praeger shows a man in non military attire with a snake at his feet looking across a valley to a a large house hill as the Church remembers the two world war victims. The belief is Rosamund Praeger got the image from the Irish image of the famine, a sketch with a hovel where the solider stands and across a valley on a hill the landlords house.

natural corona eclipse

The embossed text reads ‘Press on’ words that are repeated in the film. Like the future a corona eclipse sends us the message the laws of the universe are to be obeyed. It appears in the film as a visual reminder of higher things and beyond horizons that must be returned to.

A reviewer stuck in recent boredom (L’Enneu again) thought two recent pieces he’d read, Tom Stoppard’s The Hard Problem and Bill McKibbens’s Falter, explored if we are “hard-wired” (somehow) for empathy/altruism.

The book Babettes Feast holds a community around the one table with outsiders among the gathering.

Martine the convent caretaker says, “Now you will be poor the rest of your life“,Babette replies, “An artist is never poor.” It is set in Jutland in 19th-century Denmark. Again an isolated community.

Written in 1950 post ww2 it examines humanity – “And it happened when Martine or Philippa spoke to Babette that they would get no answers, and would wonder if she had even heard what they said Orshe would sit immovable on the three-legged kitchen chair, her strong hands in her lap and her dark eyes wide open, as enigmatical and fatal as a Pythia upon her tripod…..”

You couldn’t get more isolated than a convent and here the symbolism of a women’s retreat is evoking simple rules for simple pleasures.

Isak Dinesen the writer of this short story had been a five star chef in Paris, having sought political asylum in Denmark.

Open palms. The resurrection as a film is simultaneously in the period when the Berlin Wall came down, when Red Sorghum was made.

Cinema seeks to capture the zeitgeist of one period through another and act as a unifier of our perceptions and thoughts stimulated by instant immersion. The immediacy is without an instance, until this form of review or after film discourse takes place, and often carrying the plain speaking superficial meanings around at the time. Or like my own choice of best ever film, Ordet, untangles a whirlwind of thought and discovery.

Conclusion

Through this period of forced reflection during the Covid 19 epidemic it has thrust us forward into needing reference points evaluating what we know, what really is and how the future is part of our own making.

Red Sorghum is seen in a wide lens also. The table is a constant source with wine central to the sharing and its properties are teased in so many processes just as life’s forces. The intoxication taking over and many succumbed to its altered energy.

Zhang Yimou is a Chinese film director, producer, writer and actor, and former cinematographer. He is part of the Fifth Generation of Chinese filmmakers, having made his directorial debut in 1987 with Red Sorghum.

The Empire review below sums up the political point here –

‘But it represented life and death, birth and renewal, and the physicality and humanity of the villagers as much as it did the Party’ – is how the Empire review sums it up as a forceful political essay.

From the Empire review –

https://www.empireonline.com/movies/reviews/red-sorghum-review/

is this extract –

By setting the story in the barren wilderness around the north-eastern Gaomi Township, Zhang departed from the lush southern landscapes that Beijing preferred to see extolled on screen. He also depicted his protagonists in a far from idealised light, as he permitted them to indulge their basest instincts, right down to urinating in the wine vats (which, ironically, improved the flavour). Moreover, by allowing the only avowedly Communist character to perish at the hands of the invading imperialists, Zhang also suggested that the workers resisted their tyranny through their own innate heroism, just as their own labour and ingenuity had revived the fortunes of the winery.

https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Geography_of_China.html?id=tfVN0Gwx67YC

5#####

John Graham

30 June 2020

Belfast

This is NOT a widget! To make a donation to the blog use http://www.paypalme.com/plainwords

This was reviewed after seeing the films again on a domestic screen and still the magic of Cinema creates feelings never touched on by the ingenuity of the creative community. The genius of Cinema is often traumatised by badly conceived forms and weird unrecognisable scripts. But story and the human psyche is a minefield of conflicting ideas. Tread carefully and Be Safe.

Jeune Femme : A Film Review

38239CE9-6CC7-4DF4-B428-0B37B55D341D

MONTPARNASSE BIENVENUE Jeune Femme

Director: Leonor Serraille, Cast: Laetitia Dosch, Souleymane Seye Ndiaye, Gregoire Monsaingeon, Jean-Christophe Folly, Nathalie Richard, Arnaud de Cazes.
Produced by, Sandra da Fonseca, Bertrand Gore, Nathalie Mesuret, Written by Léonor Sérraille, Music by Julie Roué, Cinematography Emilie Noblet, Edited by Clémence Carré. Production company, Blue Monday Productions.

Duration : 1hr 38 mins. Cert. 15.

QFT note: Léonor Serraille’s Cannes Camera d’Or winning drama stars Laetitia Dosch as a 31-year-old struggling to find her place in the world following a break-up

Prone to being her own worst enemy, Paula lugs her ex’s pet cat around Paris in a cardboard box, freewheeling but determined to get back on track in life. As she meets different people along the way, there is one thing she knows for sure: she’s determined to make a new start – and she’ll do it with style and panache.

5123F631-BBED-41C9-80B7-D2564B71FA00

Jeune Femme

The starting over in the world of relationships requires many things. Firstly the previous baggage of the previous life choice is in need of assessment and revision in the learning or unlearning or making sense of other people as they find you and you find them.

Paula is out of a 10 year relationship which has been a high reward low risk conscript. Safety and no children or ties. So to find herself without the means to survive is a shock of the first order and she is in a compelling meltdown when we enter the picture. As for the future it happens from the circumstances outside the flat her ex partner, Joachim Deloche’s identity is not brought in for a long period.  Fraught phonecalls only.  The only companion going forward happens to be their estranged cat, rescued from the neighvours store.  This is a very sharp fall from a high level of what seems a normal existence and the suggestion of difference or reason for the break up is not clear. Every indication is it ought to have been sooner which is probably nagging throughout the following period while new answers are sought.

D753FD76-7BC7-4192-A30F-FAC158316A42

Outside looking in

Horrible as it may be the notion of breakdown is treated comedically here. Horrible as the notion of looking inward on someone’s problems is almost voyueristic and as approach it requires for our benefit to be done with sensitivity and prove unlike any invasion of privacy. Believing this is relatively easy as the outward play of antics unfolds. The new partnerships of herself with every aspect of her life are calibrated. We are asked to engage and engage we do with the dilemmas false and positive states Paula encounters.

If it is not refreshing, refreshing in the sense Paula is freed from this past, she verbalises it instantly.  Paula is a realist and needs to be.  While the circumstances have altered greatly, she is virtually without funds, resources, or outlook or job and has been estranged from her family. No siblings, just a Mum whose one live is as a loner who all have left her to her own devices.

Ten years investment even without creating a body of work in concert with another, anything representing a life lived is almost ambiguously absent here. The high reward has been the cocoon of comfortable living which may have superficially or otherwise been of benefit to the onward and upward Joachim but is the total opposite as it is found for Paula. Weird as this may seem it is were we are. This is Paula.

D8449650-8A62-4A69-A698-6EBA7F19FDA1

Travelling companions

Paula is here in the central representation of a modern woman whose future is in flux at 31.  Therein lies the test of the film. Do we believe this pretext do we engage and go on with the premise? As it is it is very easy to become part of the whimsy and progress if only because it is not our journey. The meltdown mentioned at the beginning is a force which exorcises the anger. That says plenty of the observed strength Paula gas and similarly you ask would I be so strong? The authorial interest is writing a series of questions.

Who am I Paula begins to ask and when asking herself is able to suggest she is who she makes herself.  Not defined but someone else’s love. ‘You the world to me’ type of trope which presents as when reversed, ‘I no longer have you so I’m nothing’. A variation of this is a positive and mortality is better than immortality if your alive sort of thing. The viable life is all that need be of concern to Paula and her focus is played out by her adopting various personas on a trial basis so to speak – in increments she tries various tactics of approach in meeting people which is problematic often and surprisingly gainful in others.

0316EA9B-4983-4D90-BA0A-573027D96780

Pulsating self

Clubbing an music are in her heart as a strong connective muse or even identity though that is not entirely properly explored. I saw her embrace the music and discard the palyacting and physical involvement often overarching its ambience and drive.

E55C9484-9803-45CF-8EFF-56A3A7D7600C

Determined to set a fresh positive start again, going at the objective of finding a partner is a priority for Paula and her assistant is a curate cat. There is a premise in the making here where the prospective lover must like cats though not necessarily be as driven and cat dependant as Paula. Meeting new people is not a problem and with the whole of Paris, the city of romance a map of lovers imaginings in all directions Paula has the positive notion of claiming her rightful place in the bewitching quest mere mortals find a life’s work. The different people she meets is the passage of this story and it reveals to Paula and us the audience revealing aspects even a 31 year old had forgotten or mislaid in the past, 2solemnly lost faith in the other part of a relationship taken for granted and through that misled into the future.

8F091BAB-3B49-4A6B-A43F-668AC15A9182

Redesign

By creating a new future and being adaptable – Paula insists in an interview one of her opportunistic happenings – she constructs a person who is meticulous, sporting, methodical, unconflicted ambiguity employed in a beautifully framed episode plus humour. One of several identity formulating encounters which makes for great cinema and form neatly composed portraits and each asking and straining to avoid placing Paula in a pigeonhole of convenience. Paula is evasively loveable. She is attractive in more than mere presence and given the reddish aspect of long locks she combines outfits in a multiple method acting ethos sometimes a ‘hint pop star’ haute couture aficionado or arty bohemian. It is all productive in the sense it provides us with multiple viewpoints but for a Paula it is a case of being all over the place. We learn as she – gently – does that she is her own worst enemy. For empathy we are fellow travellers, at least I went with it and given the superb mix and flow of the various disparate elements each following very different paths it was very watchable and entertaining often gruesomely funny while also having edgy bottom notes which are typically well handled as French cinema is at ease with. Never leaden and stale the good and bad are evoked with relativism and beefier in Paula’s problems and her dealing handsomely and genuinely with warmth to claim the prize of delivering a very good film.

C2DE635B-54BA-4FA3-A2CA-2F968D109B06

Transient visual loving eye

Visually this film carried with it the history of masters of the art of storytelling in French cinema. There were overhead views of street scenes taken at the poised easy pedestrian pace importantly defining place and other elements passing by unobserving what we are watching from above. Their are several scenes you will probably want to remember as they are formative. One I loved was during an on the move job interview where the interviewee who was a dancer took us on a joyous sense of movement up to a maids room in a longish sequence. It was beautifully done and in its contrast with previous and later scenes lent choreography to the viewers experience while removed from dance. A piece of confident and imaginative cinema.

CF230722-C5B7-4758-AA9B-337E5FF3C788

There were other scenes. Roaming scenes, one with her Mum, one inside and out of a shared sofa apartment with someone who believes Paula connects her with her past. The Paris invoked is not over sentimentalised or over evoked but is compellingly real which is certainly a big positive for a debut feature director.

Portraiture by camera

An instinctive panache means ever new beginning is treated with sumptuous panache and devilry by Léonor Serraille’s habit of playing the positive and not subscribing and making Paula subscribe to the desperate negative aspects and sometimes harsh reality in play. This is then visually expressed in the vivid colours and interchangeable almost clothes horse persons of Paula herself as she mediates her self in the circumstances as thrown up or found, actively sought out.

Parachutes are deployed metaphorically and an internal mechanism is activated announcing new starts. She is able to land a job, in fact two and one is as a babysitter to a young girl whose introspection and absence of ‘love’ is given life after several errors and misreads by a paula. This is the dancers part and it is a constructive form providing contrast to the other shopping mall job where she meets again another earlier acquaintance. Ousmane is another character we meet whose job does not fit his ambition and the comprises all round are length and common. Material things are not the object of many but the consumerism is what has them survive wither as sales people selling a dream or minding the spectacle it is another strand. Also I began to think the professions similarly were in a strange place.

Choices

Deep into the film there are choices arising for Paula involving relationships and there are further encounters with a Doctor who herself is open, and in keeping with the exploration, she too is seen to look into the past for meaning.  They spill out from everywhere, emotions caught in memory, always present and demanding.  The past tells Paula things she has not been bothered with and newness presents a clean slate in many ways.  The estrangement with her mother is also a recurring theme and Paula is kept searching in that part of her life for its meaning. Something is still harming her from within.  It I spoke something’s that she holds onto and cannot free.  My take on it was of her looking for an inner sanctity which she never had and only occasionally does she find it and it appears to her in aloneness when with other people.  The music and Yuki influence draw on this.  Even the job in the lingerie mall has its aspects of learning.  Men pay attention! The luxury of lingerie is a means to pamper which all women look to as preening for themselves and is a solitary thing, a skill in touching their feminine empowerment and from that whatever comes comes.

DC23E654-46A8-43B0-8E3A-5ADF0AD6CCC2

Comes discovery

Towards the end these choices however hard in the gathering are considered in the new mindset. While it is seen to evolve and accumulate throughout their is a knowing Paula played with drive and passion bearing fruit in every scene, by the exquisite multi faceted Laetitia Dosch whose companions in the action provide a superb robust support and ever pairing is special in some way. To name them would be be mildly patronising. There are several very, very solid performances which are needed to connect and deliver the levels reached by Laetitia Dosch in her emotional gymnastics and electric sound performance.

68E4CC31-2169-4EFA-A493-F7477676779A

Conclusion ####4

Very often the title such as Jeanne Femme is a prologue to a let down but here the title only introduces a very well gathered opening into the observed world of one young women after a breakdown.  Never trivial but incredibly full of fun and light-hearted air filled space, the visual appeal is intimating the approach taken by a Paula who is – as cliches go – her own worst enemy except once ‘free’ so to speak after a very long and significant relationship is only concerned with being positive. A cat (Muchacha) gets much publicity and air time as a reclusive friend and foil.  It is a female of exotic fussy tastes and contrast to, it has to be said, of the chameleon taste and forced re-identity moves Paula is forced into confronting.

This is a very brave and rewarding tale on just a view of feminine worlds and the multiple characters, many formed very robustly and assuredly, are thrown at the complex recalibration going on and shedding some more and valued insights along the way. The slate may be wiped clean but is it to be subject to putting down new markers and reinterpretation of the past and memory and how do the fates unfold. A lovely film and instinctively sharp delivering a very decent story of contemporary searches for self.

John Graham

18 May 2018

Belfast

On at Queens Film Theatre form 18 May until 24 May 2018

Not a widget!

To make a donation to the blog use

http://www.paypalme.com/plainwords

120 BPM : A Film Review

 

C3092951-4566-4884-B70F-907BC3530535

120 BPM

Director: Robin Campillo, Writers: Robin Campillo, Philippe Mange, Cast principals : Nahuel Pérez Biscayart, Arnaud Valois, Adèle Haenel.

Cast details : Nahuel Pérez Biscayart – Sean, Arnaud Valois – Nathan, Adèle Haenel – Sophie, Antoine Reinartz – Thibault, Félix Maritaud – Max, Ariel Borenstein – Jérémie, Aloïse Sauvage – Eva – Simon Bourgade – Luc, Médhi Touré – Germain, Simon Guélat – Markus, Coralie Russier – Muriel, Catherine Vinatier – Hélène, Théophile Ray – Marco, Saadia Bentaïeb Mère – Sean, Jean-François Auguste – Fabien.

Production Co: Les Films de Pierre, France 3 Cinéma.

France English Subtitled.  2hr 23mins.  Rated 15.

1979 on dateline

When Aids came crashing in there were few prepared for its deadly tragic consequences. Amongst the alienating devastating effects for individuals a collective panic arose across the Western world. Aids is still around and is epidemic in Africa were trucks pull up to relieve their crosssway paths and prostitution is spreading disease in places were no treatment is readily accessible. If your heart beats let it beat at 120 BPM the Film seems to say. The life is short lived when Aids is encountered and the outside world is a mere external hospital wall away. For the middle classes of France and many European cities and for that matter towns and rural communities the Virus meant their liberté, égalité, fraternité, is truly turned upside down.

D09900A3-BB57-4B06-96DB-FB8FDFA46254

Out in the open

The film begins with the weekly assembly of the Act Up Group after a disastrous protest concerning the lack of government pharmaceutical and health assistance surrounding research and tackling the scourge of sexual intercourse. They interrupt a convention on Medicine, one where the release of drug results is withheld and they confront the speakers and one protester accidentally takes it too far and ballon bombs a spokesperson with fake blood.  Horrific as it may seem that the transmission of Aids is frequently through blood products and contact with infected blood this is quite an outrage.

In a University lecture hall the meeting at length profiles the scale and extent of anxiety with a mainly young male audience.  Women are to the fore also and take part with equal measure of purpose to Act Up.  The fraternity is compulsive and the raucous determination resembles the ‘68 protests also seen on the campuses of Paris. Then the freedoms were fought for without the brinkmanship and set ideals and a framework I would say for the Socialist ‘Reality’ of workers rights we now see exposed in France today with the SNCF (railway) workers seeking protection of their rights.  Like the brilliant film with Marion Coutillard of 2016 Two Days One Night, the solidarity is squeezed to the margins. This film has the quality of discernment and authoritive public action in the form of activism. Political activism has been a staple of France for decades and Macron is as a new broom trying to sweep that under the carpet instead of widening the structures of protection of people’s rights to a life without the perils of exploitation he cosies up to.

83F98F63-C507-47D4-B3F8-C8DFFD5CC609

The disaster turns up the flame and it points up the calamitous path that they fear they might tread on.  Victims are everywhere.  Class boundaries are non existent as Aids and being HIV Positive is no respecter of gender or status. Tinder the gay app. is currently in trouble over its data breaches in allowing (allegedly) access to users data thought to be held private exchanged in relation to HIV status.

Aids America

Before this film came Dallas Buyers Club also about the difficulty of obtaining treatment and was it a superb underrated piece which Matthew McConaghy excelled and created a guardian angel role in a motel on the outskirts.

The battlements (battements is Francais for beats) are drawn in this French activist movie though it’s pace is laboured and it is slow to produce a core force of nature in response to nature’s deliverance of a plaque. Initially the piece is off the group responses and tactics and instead of the exploration of positions in depth the focus turns to the plight of an individual.

8E9228DB-2CEB-477C-A49C-2013BFC76DBA

I have seen photographs of protests into the eighties in the Netherlands, other places where sit down protests were still needed to highlight the failings of medical interventions. It is still a massive medically under resourced disease world problem. Apart from war the epidemic affects the largest percentage of world population than any other individual disease. See https://www.avert.org/global-hiv-and-aids-statistics

Disease in full spectrum 

For the film the disease is visual and viscerally in the main frame. Attitudes of Doctors and Politicians are scarily – and we recognise the same double speak in the same areas today – platitudinous and patronising.  We are looking back to the gross niavity of those times even though it was a high profile and deeply concerning time for all who engaged in sexual acts.  Deeply felt ‘morality’ judgements came forward out of the decade of the sixties promiscuity yet the sixties were nothing compared to the STD proliferation of Victorian times with Capital Cities awash with prostitution in response to poverty and male power.

This is thrity years ago and to put this on the map is an achievement underestimated in its value and profiling of the ‘problem’ which was widely misunderstood and misrepresented – so as not to cause alarm.  The unknowns caused the inevitable panic and regressive negative steps.

Of significance NOW

Clearly we live in different times but the proliferation of Aids is endemic still.  What the film achieves is the stark reality this is highly contagious while treatments only happen on the basis it’s found, treatments are accessible and the debilitating consequences are shortened and halted in a clean environment.  The film is of enormous educational value.  For children born in that period and unaware of its widespread effects this is a fully dramatic depiction of the times and highlights the constant awareness needed in repaint o sexual intercourse.  At the same time the internet (and Facebook now have 53/54 gender customised fluid sexual identities) has enabled faster discovery of the facts and help lines along with the possible outcomes.  While this is not available in under developed countries and there is enormous ignorance and blatant blocking of the facts in areas where it’s associated with practices not considered active.

Would you believe some reviewers are citing the issues as ‘mostly solved’.  A hideous ignorance of the presence which is while treatable as a disease does not eradicate the disease.  People live daily with it and it consumes them on a daily basis and would see them depart this world were it nor for programmes of measured medical interventions which often go alongside other diseases.  Nothing can stop a Multiple Sclerosis sufferer from acquiring it for instance or an amputee or disabled, sightless, or deaf impaired person from obtaining it.

C12BE160-B888-4C0E-91CF-07C2DAB91A70

The Morocco-born director Robin Campillo,(Palme d’or Winner The Class) and his co-writer Philippe Mange are following the personal tales of lesions and debilitating and the death inducing virus.  This is  not a celebration of the fight being fought but a coruscating immersion in the reality of the disease found in those times.  I found it both a refreshing replaying of hidden detail alongside the harm which never found any particular mainstream avenue of explanation.  No real previous ‘fictional’ dramatisation of events – there have been individual cases and films of Aids sufferers before – has cut into the blood as strongly as this it would seem.  The choice and some reviewers are after an educational discussion on the whys and wherefores of the personalities in the powerful position of drug development, distribution, production, dispensing and complain their knowledge gap is unfilled.  This is a deplorable route to take as the director is reliant on the factual ‘bacterial’ progress forward and back, control of the disease to be catalogued elsewhere.  The progress of the medical breakthroughs, understanding the politics of dissuaded elements are interesting but not the purpose of the film.

Finding out the bleak sorrow and end of life stories is very upsetting in this account. The portrayal by the cast is connective and unbearably shocking at times.  When the scene which stands out for many of the messenger as character is telling their story on the Metro and outside the Metro train there is a beautiful Paris contrasting with the enclosure of the train it is chokingly subversive and involving.  The young entering inevitable death is shocking.

B55E7A8D-42C4-4FA4-8321-719517670168

In the early passages where the group refrain from clapping.  They click fingers instead to denote approval there is a developmental logic entering.  Of difference.  The group leader/organiser Thibault (Antoine Reinartz), is to interpret and direct the flow.   As with civil rights there is a counter productive element who have to be persuaded to be less unproductively militant even violent.  Like Civil Rights and throw French until recent times; the resurgence of the Le Pen monolithic selfish nationalist propensity, there is an element who may destroy the goal and objectives.  Just for example as the IRA and it’s Loyalist counterparts (alliances within Government co-conspirators) brought down decades of death and destruction and and unachieved liberty of peace and rights.  For this line a ‘choice’ of sub-lieutenant is a girl unfittingly.  Sophie (Adèle Haenel), is deployed as anger central.

There is a cause of love centrally in the film.  A Mesut Ozil (Arsenal F.C. & Germany) young lookalike, you might see the resemblance!

98993319-0012-4903-A30C-8B9A62371E92

Nahuel Perez Biscayart and Arnaud Valois are Sean and Nathan,

The illusion of a world order is displayed in World Football leagues and with an alleged 1 billion audience for a Man City v Man Utd football game two Saturday’s ago the priorities of this world stilll are extraordinarily maladjusted as is the Arsenal Football team the adore mentioned multi-million earning Germam could testify to.

For the relationship it becomes matured before Seán reaches twenty.  The openness of their relationship becomes immaerial and contrary to the norms found they are pioneers of this short lived freedom which is their adjustment and almost only measurable success.

 

Conclusion ####4

The importance of this film is its multi layered excessive in truth telling and its very significant contribution for the youth of today to the examination of, learning of, that ‘commodified’ element of their lives, the sexualised part and the difficult primary function within their lives which is where the love found came with deadly consequences often. Blue Is the Warmest Colour, in 2013 is another young film of similar intensity.  A French teen (Adèle Exarchopoulos) forms a deep emotional and sexual connection with an older art student (Léa Seydoux) she met in a lesbian bar.
Director: Abdellatif Kechiche

 

There are plenty of curve balls thrown in this one, like the normal day to day jobs or lack of, the rallies converge which is never examined.  The reason being the disease is classless and it is an undercurrent you are supposed to feel.

The biggest curveball of all is how is this not a centralised political and human concern of the highest proportions?  How could it be very productive to take it fully prioritsedand perhaps be a redefining part of our essences in learning the basic human relation to sexual drivers?  Everywhere there is dysfunction and everywhere a basic degradation is visited on the human form including the psyche with the occurrence of diseases only a measure of this dysfunction.

For a heart beating at 120 BPM there is still hope.

 

John Graham

9 April 2018

Belfast

The film is showing 06 April 2018 until 19 April 2018 at QFT Belfast

Not a widget!

To make a donation to the blog use

http://www.paypalme.com/plainwords

J’Oscar’s 2017 : Film Review Awards

J’Oscar’s    A glass half full?

Here’s the envelope. Thanks. Oh this is exciting and after last year no mistakes, right? Oh it can’t be – didn’t it star, well he was under a white sheet most of the time, but surely you can’t give it to this movie. Didn’t he get embroiled in some sleaze about behaviour onset? OK, there’s no mistake.

The J’Oscar for Best Picture of 2017

IMG_2707

……. goes to A Ghost Story

Through clenched fingers up to my face and I Place at No. 1 of all the films I saw throughout 2017 the remarkable A Ghost Story.  As a Film is greater than the individuals and one should not destroy a films validity I discard malice felt towards an actor whose case has boot been publicly aired from a decision on the meet of a film. While some and those privately hurt by any actions that may have taken place will have their own reasons to denounce such a position it is to be balanced alongside,

 

1. Where it known, would the man have been given the part?

2. Does the entire cast and crew making this astonishing film have to be dismissed along with the actor making their achievements null?

3. Should film producers not have a role in calling out misdemeanours and passing on details to authorities outside the businesses instead of muck slinging inside it which becomes friable as a result when newspapers and other media get to speak of it?

Creating such a remarkable film David Lowery does not deserve to be snubbed in recognising the immense quality of the whole ensemble including Rooney Mara and the editing sound and cinematography contributions.  Blazingly brilliant film.

Perpetuity in a singularity 

A Ghost Story is a film about perpetuity and the ever moving wonderous world we inhabit and has a touch of heaven about it.  Surreality is dictionalised yet the reality is with us as we pause in watching this film to consider the outcomes we have been apart of and how the future will happen regardless of our presence.  The Ghost is us looking in on the immovable constant moving on.

Other awards go to ………

Mary Queen of Scots was a Platform for two brilliant performances from actresses, Ireland’s Saoirse Ronan as Mary and Australia’s Margot Robbie as Elizabeth the First. With them both having accomplished great roles and performances in respectively I,Tonya and Ladybird the closesness to Best Actress must be a sharp call. They are also challenged by Meryl Streep who many are in awe of despite the performance in The Post being lauded largely because it creates a large canvas and she as a fine actress has the skills of ‘pause and reflect’ timing which is allowed here due perhaps to the eras pace not the rush through a more contemporary part would have pushed upon us. So the Oscar goes to – see below!

The I,Tonya story is an excruciating piece of drama for lovers of fair play and points to the winner at all costs mentality pervading many sports. From dodgy injections in footballers to dampen pain before a very crucial match, to the Olympic level drug and substance abuse to the on road ‘replacement therapies cyclists partake in to get to the head of the pack, the story rarely is covered by cinema. No one loves a cheat and the scenarios are usually not pretty. The last time I liken an athletes grime story and reinstatement was the brilliant Matthew Maconaghy in The Dallas Buyers Club which was an epic and underated dramatic off road, road movie. The endurance and counterpunches of Margot Robbie whose immersion was instantly believably in my mind skated off with the Best Actress Award.

The J list

D7CEA665-B4A8-4B65-B37D-EE02F909D3E4

Extras

Hogh flying films such a short Killing of a Sacrificial Deer and Insyriated will last long in the memory and of course are worth seeing several times.

The Farthest was a remarkable documentary worth mentioning and revisiting.

Notable hypes include Dunkirk and Real Actresses Don’t die in Liverpool.  Along with the over rated – exceptional though of the mark In his choices of going off on his own reading of the man is Gary Oldman. Darkest Hour.  The films Shape of Water and Ladybird rank highly but not notably and it is only through the gifted direction and playing of Saiorse Ronan does Ladybird achieve the distinction of a near miss director award.  That went to a someone whose films are gaining the storytelling and visual connection with audiences. (Jordan Peele – Get Out)

Much more can and will be written about this turn around year for Film making. Jennifer Lawrence is off on Exec. Producing the #metoo as a series. It will unearth and keep the profiling of the film industry high but not unfortunately with the added distinction of keeping belief in a fictional portrayal as a means of entering an issue or providing very important insight on aspects of humanity. Most is seen in the minutiae of drama in the big picture and The Florida Project was a sensitive other form of insight which is near the top in terms of films I rated this past year. It and other stranger ones.

John Graham

28 February 2018

Belfast

Not a widget!

To make a donation to the blog use

http://www.paypalme.com/plainwords

The Midwife : A Film Review

IMG_2080

The Midwife

Director. Martin Provost. Screenwriter. Martin Provost. Music. Grégoire Hetzel. Cinematography. Yves Cape. Editor: Albertine Lastera. Cast.  Catherine Frot, Catherine Deneuve, Olivier Gourmet, Quentin Dolmaire, Mylène Demongeot, Pauline Etienne, Audrey Dana, Marie Paquim.  Producer. Curiosa Films / France 3 Cinema / Versus Production.  Camera (color, widescreen): Yves Cape.  Drama. Comedy | Comedy-Drama. France. Duration 1hr 57mns. 2017.  Cert. 12a.

IMG_2076

What’s expected?

A midwife Claire (Catherine Frot) gets an unexpected  call from her father’s old mistress, Béatrice (Catherine Deneuve) and they overcome long held exclusion from each other’s lives to put together a new relationship of friendship. This is the first time these great actresses have worked together.  The film begins with a picture of Claire at work and the medical drama of new born life is as a metaphor for new beginnings.  Martin Provost has some brilliantly composed lines and it is often like a novelist describing the minor detail, painting the larger picture we are eased into.  That bigger picture is the enduring power of connections sharing different memories and moving on to form a new warmer, tender beginning, in the later chapter of their lives.  Claire’s kind hearted strength of having been the midwife and someone who continues to deliver babies,  is faced with career choice with Hospital ‘efficiencies’ causing a sweeping away of the old and this too is another form of metaphor for change in someone’s life.  We assume we have three acts, the junior, the summer then the winters tale.  The unkind conveyor belt mechanised world is not indifferent but is certainly less intrinsically human and money too features across this film as a ‘commodity’ of trade.  The new regime would be in – out, out, which troubles her conscious of what world we need enter at birth.   Béatrice has been the cavalier capricious free spirit which Claire’s father made his mistress, possibly a paid companion, against the backdrop of Claire’s upbringing and own sense of family which was insular and having had mixed messages.  From her fathers philandering and her mothers burden; little is revealed about her, of being never seen to be happy but moderately raging.

IMG_2071

Tale of two Catherine’s

Frot (Marguerite) and Deneuve (3 Hearts) came at this with half of France, the attached to film half, full of anticipation of a Gallic weft of modern love and fidelity covering a period post 1969 and the quiet revolution dealing in the present with past times and establishing new revisions of life.  Claire’s husband was a swimmer of some skill and a successful sportsman.  Think Mark Spitz lookalike, (younger ones use a search engine) virile, moustachioed, swimmers body and he fell off the public world of sport, no longer attaining the adoration, in the void, of his closest, maybe, so his spirit was held together by Béatrice.  Domestic life for Claire, an only child, was fraught and she recalls the part of Béatrice in her childhood course.  Nantes? is where Claire lives and she is content in this town with long attachments.  A beautiful moment – of directorial/screenwriters complicit, comes later at another birth scene.  There are many and quite graphic.  Some involving presumably ‘clinical’ models.  There is also a clear heads up on Béatrice’s condition which is life threatening.  Béatrice’s condition is a fulcrum to the establishment of a new ‘maternal’ relationship and it has a great deal of very thoughtful and deliciously cinematic force in the minuscule which French Cinema teases out for droplets of screen genius.  Cafe scenes are particularly all enveloping.  Firstly they are basically a place for reasonably priced food of quality and habitually patronised – the polar opposite of the ‘nameless/named’ posh restaurants where good food is seen by the practicing chefs as your privilege to consume, these edible artworks.  Splendidly adroit is the detail,

IMG_2074

Martin Provost delivers key speeches on these moments.  Reveals often happen over a dinner plate. Not the minor ‘I am a vegetarian’ ‘I don’t drink, I get too emotional.’   Lines are a soufflé and rise to perfection – without giving too much hubris to what is simply a good meal well taken – as this film provides.  Some lines I forbid myself from passing on but they are a testimony to the heft and construction of the medium of such ‘soft’ cinema.  Martin Provost’s gift of language and his humanity along with the delivery of the well crafted scenes, is a fundamental graceful exploration of our values, conceits, misinterpretations, bad times, good times with readjustment and a sensuous affirmation of life with new beginnings – if delivered by The Midwife.  Some births are difficult (some recent thought is given to it being the origin of violence at the pre-birth and delivery itself portending fate!) and this is a tale of taking life as it happens to exist.

The pleasure Claire receives from being The Midwife, induces a maternal instinct which seems to kick in over other parts of her life.  From the juniors she tutors, to the to-be father intent on seeing and retaining this memory of his child’s birth, she places him in control alongside her.

IMG_2084

Prowess and excellence

Séraphine (2008 seven César Awards)  Violette, are most renowned Martin Provost films, and the previous years (2015) Things To Come, was a deeper themed film, using premier acting talent (Isabelle Huppert a lapsed professor roping a young man) and now The Midwife, is a companion piece of a seemingly slightly lesser mould but it is accurately playful and scopes out a story without having a doctrine or pledge of moral guidance but instead provokes the ‘well what would I have done?’ test of French ingenuity.  With regard to screen presence and performance ever present in some portion in domestic French film, it recalls Bardots sexual presence, though here the view is reflected back.  Denueve as  temptress is easy to imagine and having used her allure with her compelling sexuality striving to reach her inner spiritual self seeking something different than the banal.  Béatrice has even altered her name we learn, implying the child looking out to a more attractive future.  This is a docile view on sexual capture and how Claire’s father was enraptured by Béatrice.  As Julie Newmar said about her onscreen presence with Batman it was about the sexual chemistry and that was a kids comic story, it was a flirtation with life’s expectations.  So is this little composition piece has, with the richest ingénue, Catherine Denuevue alongside the more staid Catherine Frot, has elements of a feminine story – not as ‘frothy’ as Madame Bovary – but which similarly tells of a middle aged woman seeking fulfilment outside her marriage and seeing the existing bourgeois in its attire, disheartening and unchallenging of her inner spirit.

IMG_2075

These actresses, Queen-pins of French Cinema, have a great time knowingly playing with their own perceptions of womanhood.  Catherine (Béatrice) has instinctively from a child perhaps formed two selves.  The outer complaint one and the inner one who questions and this extends outwardly towards her desires.  Her excessively sensuous charm and strikingly attractive appearance is conflicted with her habitual reserve.  The reserve in Catherine (Claire) is meticulously, serene, ordered and her attractiveness is the whole assuredness, with you thinking her devotion to herself as a construct, is material upon some inner spiritual strength, a Mother Superior who isn’t a gad-fly perhaps a product of her childhood and necessity to prove a way forward to bring up children in opposition to her own upbringing.  Marguerite (a Florence Foster Jenkins comic role) won Gaul, Catherine Frot a César Award, makes ten! She shows her comedic and serious sides here with ease. There are startling moments in the candor of touch which have you thinking outside expectations.  Little accident but superbly crafted acting/directing brought together with more depth for you to absorb.

Two looks at loving.

On relationships, Béatrice who latches on a question from Claire, explains her itinerary of lovers and short lived good times – without delving too much into the longer past – and she is quick to see Claire’s approach to men as having little tact or womanly instinct, something Béatrice has in spades.  That is another foible of Béatrice’s – the money thing and taking un-proportioned risk.  Going beyond the no risk and healthier tact of Claire’s, non-smoking, no gambling, no-drinking, no-sex drive, no-exertion – only fresh air at her allotment and delivering in most senses, a sterile unpassionate directed professional direction with her unfolding life.  The comparison the film provides through the story is revealing to Claire herself.  This relationship she takes on, is as an act of courage, suspending the past but learning through the course of things parts of the backstory she had little proper recall of.

IMG_2092

Into the picture come..

There are two other characters I haven’t got round to mentioning who play a large part. Though this is like a two handed piece it would be lost without other ingredients to shift and press out realities. The characters brought, are both on Claire’s side of the relationship.  One is her son Antoine (Quentin Dolmaire) whose comes along with his girlfriend to see his mother. The young couple both study cadavers and ‘life’ at Medical school.  They are quite startled by the emergence of Béatrice and the maternal instincts Claire has brought home again, which have them concerned.

IMG_2095

There is also a new character Claire meets at the allotment and a friendly, unexpected relationship develops there, much to Béatrice’s happy surprise. Mr Paul Baron (I think he actually tries referencing a name change!) played terrifically lightly by Olivier Gourmet, looks after his ailing fathers allotment and he also is away a lot.  The free spirits now surround Claire!  Mr Paul, after a walk up hills, where his breathlessness Martin Provost includes as testimony of their being past his ‘peak’ – no pun intended, Claire is fit from cycling. Here it becomes a place of normality as she surveys the wide horizon from her new viewpoint. All this and no car to search further! This story of late love is itself very touching in a slightly saccharine – not overly – dramatic way which employs some now – things are happening despite everything that preoccupies the time in both Claire’s and Béatrice’s lives which means they have to grapple with an assortment of things as life provides.

IMG_2094

Anyone fancy a bit of trepanning?

Overtly conspicuously Gallic.

Cruelly some have described ‘pleasantries’ as treacly.  Obviously down to the viewers expectations. There is a scene when Claire eventually takes to the wheel of a car which is a comedy overplaying her incapabilities.  It has the added pleasure of taking us on a tour of backstreets of Paris, the posh bits of Place des Invalides? Rue de Grenelle? Rue de Varenne? Embassy nooks, familiar places and a slow journey along the Seine.  There is a lot of travelling and a Road trip thrown in which is fun for all concerned, viewer included. With no compromises necessary, French Cinema has the ability to express, emphasise parts of the story with some brio and it is sometimes told with bold strokes. Of simple notes such as Claire’s private ‘regard’ of her looks coming unexpectedly or the Road trip where bonding camaraderie are forged notes. The musical score too is plaintive and melancholic at times and some special ‘homage’ is paid by Béatrice’s reminiscences with Paul over a glass or two.  They are not with as some critics would have you believe, done with a blacksmiths hammer but with adroit grace and It is especially true with Catherine Denuenve who is gorgeously indiscreet with her character and fends off nonsense while showing a brilliant vunerablity.  There is no acquiescence made on her taking on the role and not delivering a perfected performance down to her tactility with everything she handles. It sits just so as they say.  As it should.

Very little of the narrative is flexing of French emotional angst.  No ‘fracas’ no ‘terrible consequences’ just clothing references from the extremely fashionable, silk bloused incorrigible at times playacting Béatrice whose life is to hang on.  She wears leopard, tiger prints, gold bold jewellery and flirts everywhere with her pursed red rouge lips.  Com si com sa. Just to be ungallic.

Conclusion ####4

This is played by two wise and gifted performers alongside a troupe of splendidly observant actors whose place is of plenty of import as we embrace the new relationship formed by the two principles.  The course ahead is a rocky one and in md-life the past comes home with a vengeance.  For Claire it is a pathway out of her slumber as a single parent and having the difficulty of a making career choice which itself is problematic.  Béatrice is opposite and once wild adventure seeker and has now to face a health problem which will maybe topple her from her lust for life.  Martin Provost is something of a storyteller who makes films. His way with words and crafting a script have novel forms to it.  There are some lines worthy of an August serious novel and in this cinematic form deepen the appeal of watching an ensemble of talents playing out his narrative with wonderful tact and pace.  There are some fairly predictable elements however these are merely to catch the watchful viewer and accord some states of normality in parts that appear convenient story elements.  Mr Paul for instance turning his potatoes on the allotment.  The work situations as they unfold for Claire and her taking a maternal role.  It’s likely these are the items some regard as staid, and crisis what crisis? type retorts.  Very unkind and not appreciative of the glorious way both play their respective woman profiles and placing nuanced knowing wisdom in the fallow ground of simple concept to make fertile ideas about life’s challenges and how the past appropriates our actions.  This is a very entertaining and enveloping watch.  The comedy is raw at times and others subtle and subversive.  It is a remarkable piece of film making which confirms the status of the author as a wise pair of hands and eyes on the spectral wonder that is French cinema. No devices or contrivances needed.  To watch you need go along with the story as a chorus of multiple played notes which you have to take according to your own perceptions.
John Graham

5 July 2017

Belfast

On at Queens Film Theatre from Friday 14 July to Wednesday 26 July.  No screening on Sunday 23 July 2017.