God’s Own Country : A Film Review


God’s Own Country 

Directed by Francis Lee. Produced by Manon Ardisson, Anna Duffield, Diarmid Scrimshaw,  Jack Tarling.  Written by Francis Lee. Cast . Josh O’Connor, Alec Secareanu, Ian Hart, Gemma Jones.  Cinematography Joshua James Richards.  Edited by Chris Wyatt.  Production companies. Inflammable Films, Magic Bear Productions, Shudder Films. 1hr 45mins. Cert. 15.

Introduction

The BFI sponsored Gods Own Country provides this introduction – Both post-gay and pre-Brexit, Francis Lee’s debut feature is anything but a straightforward coming-out tale. Instead it’s an eerily beautiful love story between two men and the wild Yorkshire landscape. The film is partly based on writer and director Lee’s own life, where he also had to make a decision to either stay and work on his family’s farm, or whether to go off to drama school.

Basis

Francis Lees first feature film is a portrait of contemporary life in the Pennines for a family beset with troubles keeping their small farm going. Johnny Saxby played with grim determination, by a frequently sullen Josh O’Connor has the task of taking on his fathers chores and running the isolated hill top farm above the city of Bradford in its foothills. Keithley is in the civic boundaries of Bradford yet is a generation or two away from the complexities of urbanity and the arduous task of taking on a farms relentless time consuming running.


Ponderous Pennines

Endless labour and maintenance sits badly with John. He is nevertheless conscious of the help needed, as his father Martin played with sturdy robust effectiveness by Ian Hart, is in recovery from a stroke and is unable to walk without the aid of crutches.   His grandmother who runs the house is the resolute Gemma Jones making up a strong cast who are joined by the fourth pillar of the film, Romanian worker Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu) a seasonal worker. They have put out requests for assistance on the farm and his was the only reply.
From the beginning this film is framed simply around the central activities of the locality familiar to rural people and the land is suitable only for sheep grazing and rearing and the keep of some heifers.  They are few and they are equally on a limited mission to produce the occasional calf.   The work is centred on the sheep flock and the season is spring when plenty of work is needed. Day and night.

Labour

Johnny is seen in the initial stages as this forlorn character who is capable and knowing, in the labours and tasks which his father daily repeats.  Martin still in charge, puts across his replayed management regardless of the wishes of a Johnny whose job is lonely and unsatisfying.  The forlorn part of him sees no evidence of a future as the daily grind is unremitting.   Also clear from the beginning is his waywardness and mental need for company and he embarks on satisfying his wants by having gay sex with a local who offers him this release which he uses as a separate but fraught fulfilment.  It is contrasting with his bi-sexual failings with a young woman who has briefly returned from College and shows his anxiety at not being able to construct what might have been, signalled only, an alternative relationship of mutual satisfaction.  He rails against this young brief returnee who all too clearly puts in place his fixity.   He cannot and will not let down either his father or Grandmother and sees the road ahead as a tough and daunting reality which he must endure.


The predicament is played out extremely sensitively to show the sensitivity of commitment, to severance,  with what is – the other member of the cast I failed to mention – Gods own Country – and the beautiful countrysid.  It has barely altered rugged stones hill as grasslands climbing above the tungsten lights and sodium arcs other city of Bradford below.  It venerates both the city and the locality of the farm in essence placing town against country in the narrative.

Land aplenty –  another country

Gheorghe Is the incomer and Johnny is in need of his assistance big time.  The work is gathering pace with work on fences, stone walls tumbled, feeding, heifers as well as sheep in the throes of birthing new born calves and lambs.  Gheorghe is a stronger and more mentally attuned to the agricultural labours needed around him.  That quickly becomes apparent this is something of a salvation for Gheorghe as it takes him back to the farming he grew up with.  He comes from a country which has a greater wealth of agricultural land and is capable of feeding a large part of Europe but is is as he tells John, a Dead Country. Despite the Romanians having kept hold of a tough and contested country and past the days where the Romanians, because of some of their nation’s population being nomadic, denying them the rights of ‘landowners’ – the landgrabbers exploiting the displaced as well as the soil.


Education and self definition via. Religious or Cultural establishment was the legacy brought up to and into the 21st century. The land in Romania is unlike any other but migration has destroyed that country after fascist leaders and dictatorial penance brought on by countries neighbouring Romania continuing the explorations and failing to restore a country in turmoil from generations of internal torture and wilful suppression. The EU stood and watched and acted very slowly and inadequately which outcomes now confirm all too evidently.


Ways of living 

Gheorghe Represents another way of doing things and he is in some harmony with this Pennine landscape as it reminds him of the lost opportunities fixed in his mind. Every task is fairly routinely known for him to manage as a farmer should and as many hands make light of work he brings a sense of comfort. John is drawn into exploring the world of Gheorghe and in a central part of the film they converge as both creatures needing each other’s form of contact. They become explicitly intimate and as with earlier scenes they engage in sexual acts which are filmed as escalating bonding.

With this central bonding taking place on the hills in the lambing season and the work interrupting their figuring out what their relationship means to each, the film tries to boil it down in the simplest terms and follows actions as each work away separately and in unison.


This period in which their friendship moves from initial hostility and challenge to friendship and then intimate sexual acts is also a time when John is less in need of the alcohol which his frequent disabuse of has his father and Grandmother outraged and despairing of. He also begins to appreciate the nature and the location more though it’s far from clear what is to happen.
In the hills they are alone to develop their unbridled kinship. It is drawn from their resources and from emptiness and creates a bond which John finds unquenchable. The story is lifted into a soulful place which is matched by the physicality of their relationship.


Bonding alters things

When they return after many days away on the hills living rough in tumbledown stone buildings and only a ‘student staple’ for a diet, (some lager is labelled but no product placement takes place!) it is to a different atmosphere as the routine is shifted with the father Martin being less clear as to his son’s mood and detects its alteration. It is a film about challenges and family with compromises and uncertainties. Both men are at similar points in their lives and are in choices are appearing. Gheorghe Is more fatalistic while at the same time is optimistic. John has no direction in mind and sees only the family responsibility as his primary focus. The stakes rise and the choices are starkly addressed.

I have colour enhanced some of the photographs from the online screen source and trailer and this is a brighter visual than the one seen.

There are a limited number of scenes away from the dales but when it reaches the dales in the hill camp while they tend the lambing sheep and look around them there is a rough and ready state contrasted with the natural continuity provided by the seasonal changes. Though shot for springtime the weather is harsh and little sunlight reaches here.   It would have a brilliant resonance where it to carry on as a film into the ‘summer’ of a relationship as the fragile bond is seen in my mind as one which is left in the compass of things like an uncrossed border.  Though everyone can make up their own mind there is a limbo of thought involved.  There are shades of the family coming out narrative but again the backstory is unfleshed and comprises only the four principals.  Apart from those shades the colour of the film is dulled beyond recognition and there is no metaphorical brightness of contrasting emotions on view.  It is unfortunately meek and dull in colourist terms, which conflicts with the way the place and emotions might and could be envisaged.  It is fixed in the melodramatic depressing theme in all honesty.


Spatial wonder of colour

When it is played out the only seemingly permanent thing possibly to be drawn from it would appear to be the relationship of people in need of helping one another and their being no sole path nor right or wrong way of approaching things but to be capable of discerning what choices are bad ones and not to be reliant on expectations.  The other is the title provides, Gods own Country may seem a bit cliched as a title.   It probably is and no God fearing etc. Tolerance was contained within it – to the naked eye – but it revokes a lot of prerceptions people might have on how relationships form and what attachments are drawn to them. It is a naked attempt quite literally by the writer to have audience affected by what they see and to put down their judgements and not to place notions of – cliched rhetorical retorts – onto something which ought not to concern them while putting forward means to adjust. While it is something of a long drawn out film to make such a point given the meter of open discussion on same sex marriage or civil partnerships, it also seems it an axiomatic subject and deals with the formation of relationships from wherever they gather.

 

Conclusion ###3

The initial stages of the film are a shade dismal with the central figure, Johnny binge drinking, random sexual encounters and overstate the dynamic with some predictability on show.  The authenticity is only raised by the farming composite – in Gods own Country – as it feeds the narrative and the quad bike is a staple road trip type journey into that landscape. Johnny on the farm duties after being told like a schoolboy what his tasks were by a disabled and confined bitter father.  Bitterness rubbing shoulders.  Mud and trailers and binder twine.   There is a lot of shaking of hay later numerous sex scenes and they are sometimes overdrawn and I thought pointless in length and voyeuristic.  They are mixed in locality for variance but after the initial physical bonding they develop little conversation of what they initial thought of each other or about themselves as relationship of any type require. The dialogue is brusque flat Northern and abrupt as well as dulling ly avoiding the centrality of what’s meant behind the words.

The encounters do fill space and the unfolding dynamic is perhaps necessarily spoken through the intimacies.  There is an excellent eye for detail and the film was presumably able to get by with a limited budget and is not overstretching itself by being something of a cinematic juxtaposition of city versus rural visions and it seldom actually puts itself over as being of a lesson on England. It could in fact be anywhere. Montana. Utah. Austria. Romania. Spain. Shades of Brokeback Mountain perhaps.  With the reliance on all those places on patterns of living which are changing rapidly and old values are being supplanted.

The realism is a feature which has the characters develop with some surety in their story and it is believable in that regard. It is an odd set up though with an only son, no relatives, – a scene at which some might be expected is a no show – and the mother never mentioned is not a narrative enabler but a stumbling block perhaps. It is a commentary made, narrow ranged, very well acted and thoughtful film of interest to many quarters but it laboured for me and didn’t offer too many tokens of insightful oblique unique view warranting it’s greater exposure. It was great do to see the exchanges though between the generations and the opposites colliding.

And there are plenty of secrets here. Following his father’s stroke, Johnny Saxby (a terrific, stoically anguished performance from Josh O’Connor) has been forced to take over the daily running of the farm. Surveying his efforts with thin-lipped disapproval are his grandmother (Gemma Jones) and his dad (Ian Hart). With vowels as flat and hard as flagstones, they pass judgment on his efforts. It’s hard to say which weighs him down more – the responsibility or the massive chip on Johnny’s shoulder. To numb his dissatisfaction, he binge-drinks and engages in angry bouts of gay sex with strangers.
Then Romanian worker Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu) arrives to help out over the lambing season. Limpid-eyed and almost painfully handsome, his presence unnerves Johnny, who finds it hard to unpick the difference between aggression and attraction. Their first sexual encounter is all sweat and spit, dirt and urgency. But Gheorghe brings some of the tenderness he shows to the animals into what soon becomes a relationship fuelled by Pot Noodles and stolen moments. Through Gheorghe, Johnny can once again see the beauty in the land he had started to regard as a tomb.

John Graham

7 September 2017

Belfast

On at Queens Film Theatre from Friday 8 September through to and including Friday 21 September 2017.
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Jawbone : A Film Review


Jawbone

Produced by Michael Elliott, Johnny Harris. Written by Johnny Harris.  Cast. Johnny Harris as Jimmy McCabe, Ray Winstone as William Carney, Ian McShane as Joe Padgett, Michael Smiley as Eddie, Luke J.I. Smith as Damian, Anna Wilson-Hall as Mary. Director : Thomas Q. Napper. Duration: 1 hr 31 mins. Cert. 15. 

Seconds out

There is no place to go for anyone whose hope has gone.  The future is a place of roadkill.  It will swallow you up.  The mind sees things it cannot control and the future is best left alone so horrendous it seems looking forward.  So what is there to do except go backwards.  Unwind the past beyond the turmoil which formed the bridge between then and now.   Jimmy McCabe (Johnny Harris) has hope but fear also and his upbringing has been in a closed world of boxing.  A neutral corner in his life. A year ago his mother died and he is about to lose through this own disconnection with the world the tower block flat he grew up in.  His family as young boxer were his trainer Eddie (Michael Smiley), promoter Joe (Ian McShane), and club owner Bill (Ray Winstone). He is in control only when he is in the ring as a fighter. As a boxer he became at 22 an ABA (Amateur Boxing Association) champion which is the biggest step on the ladder to becoming a professional. 


Boxing bored of control

In boxing you are either a boxer or a fighter.  Unless you are gifted and are both you will not succeed unless you are so beyond being a fighter you become a warrior or like Evander Holyfield lightening quick and as balanced as a dancer at the height of their powers.  Some boxers are so gifted as to become a capable of outwitting your opponent in every move as it’s seen in advance and a matter of choosing the right time to unleash their demons.  Seldom do boxers come through on the scale needed to sustain a living.  Joe Calzaghe was a Welsh boxer who trained in himself with his father to be hard as nails and in a club without any distractions or manipulative promoters after a quick return and fall guys.  Another was Ricky Hatton who grew a Manchester and bigger following to become a super light middleweight and his craft was speed and accuracy.  A dynamite boxer fearless, fit and fast.  Joe Calzaghe was able to handle his rise through the ranks and another Carl Froch came up with him to be British World Champion boxers. 


Jimmy McCabe is a fictional boxer and this a cut at the boxing life not seen that often in film, never mind a British film.  The boxing clubs that thrive in the working class areas and inner cities from Manilla to Manchester.  This is not at the turbulent Rocky out on your feet kamikaze ruthless blood letting film which has arches of blood swooshing around and miracles off the canvas. Yet it has as a climax a fight choreographed by Barry and Shane McGuigan.  Those two also ‘advise’ ‘train’ the boxers/actors in their ring craft in the club.  Just as well it’s not true, they couldn’t train white mice. So much than you’ll not get a sequence here, how many Rocky’s?  Taking boxing by the throats is what the promoter does.  

Joe (Ian McShane), is a character smart from his Deadwood part, here as the chief fixer and fight maker.  He appears only a few times and is played as a cross between Ronnie O’Sullivan and Barry Hearn.  One a joker maverick skilled player and the other super spiv Svengali deal maker. It doesn’t amount to much here though and it’s only a passing element. He is close to fight arrangements and sets up something for Jimmy.  It is off the usual boxing radar and highly dangerous. His skill is publicity and hype as marketing need appeal to the lower end of the market, promising this is only the beginning.  It’s usually the beginning of the end as a fighters roster needs to contain a win to loss ratio of 10 to zero.  Amateur ranks are full of talent but their ring craft is for three rounds although in tournaments they find themselves boxing every three days sometimes.


The setting

The film has a straight forward arc and is from the very beginning establishing the despair and near collapse in Jimmy’s life where things pile up and haunt him.  He is fighting addiction and is near loosing his bearings which went after his mum died.  He now is in a fixed loop with nowhere to turn and the boxing is the only thing in his mind with any real pleasure or self of self.  He is not able to fix himself without some help so goes back to the Union Street Boxing Club.  In the club the old faces of Bill (Ray Winston) who is the overseer in the under the railway arches of South East London, Lambeth and beyond, is a reconstructed hardman type as age catches up with the character and the actor.  He portrays it as always with supremely brilliant timing and facial tone.  The rough and readiness is not a put on but an everyday projection of life in the lower reaches of boxing.  He is also the deliverer of some very well crafted lines and the delivery is as I say supremely well gauged as usual for Winstone.  Eddie (Michael Smiley) has apart of a dog eyed trainer.  His long bearded face, the hound of the training ring, delivered in nasal bass Belfast notes by a flaccid poor one dimensional character which Smiley occupies as a reciter of the McGuigan training words and gestures.  Then his other acting skill was to use his hands holding Jimmy’s head in place while he delivered a heated bit of encouragement.  One thing I noticed was he barely ‘smiled,’ no pun intended nor moved a great deal.  No animation whatsoever and someone said it was ‘brilliant’ – some mistake! – and we never got to see his impressive new gnashers.  Good boxers have a good set of teeth if they come out the other end and can afford the replacements the gum shield and constant battering have loosened.  Jimmy McCabe (Johnny Harris) has an impressive set.  Eddie occupies an awful lot of the film as it is shot mainly in the club with a lot of outdoor work and nighttime embankment solid very well filmed and a continuation of the work Jimmy puts in – and it’s far from fake – you get a strong sense of the depths of fitness needed for a fight and it is increased and increased with every frame.  In the club there are the newest recruits to boxing.  A failure of the story was its lack of engagement with any of the junior ranks.  Not one said a word.  Not even conversational asides.  Still this was a minor problem though the same could be said about the plainness of the storylines given.  Not too many sub plots.  So Eddie was ‘boring?’ but not Bill who you got some change from watching his mastery of the part.  Jimmy AKA Johnny Harris has put his heart and soul into this film and it is this ‘tunnel’ perhaps that separate it from being a great British film of the times, Tales of the Long distance Runner, Saturday Night, Sunday Morning genre.  

 

Redemption

Salvaging something out of a life of addiction and getting beyond the harmful effects, which can be lasting and take the edge of everything including pain, is a redemptive cause.  Celebration can come if a success is made of it.  Lately Antony Joshua became a world champion at 26 having been through a few of life’s knockdowns which involved petty crime and misuse of his strength involving also electronic tagging.  His tale is a reality. A very timely one as far as this film is concerned.  There is an unobtrusive soundtrack and it is by Paul Weller showing mixing skills hitherto unheard by myself with it used very smartly (in the way Raw and Jim Williams didn’t – see last review!) with it enhancing the impact of thumping sound mixed punches and scene crowd hysteria with an energy which has you move you chin out of the way of the latest punch.  It is a good cal to have it scored so well and with a light touch. 

Conclusion ###3

For a film to get you gripped by the main character it requires a bit of screenwriter craft to draw you into the essence of the person.  I never got that until it was too late with this.  It was actually in the last third with very little drama involving pathos or sympathy in the arc and I suppose it is because the character Jimmy is an enigma.  He was less enigma towards the end.  As a boxer it is a lonely place to be.  Every boxer is on the way to proving his worth and is out to give up little of his emotional underlying self.  Ricky Hatton, even Muhammad Ali were underneath a construct of multiple persons.  The violent man was suppressed most of the time while they were bodily mentally tuned to be destroyers and to reach the top they had to be just that.  Hence the incomparable Ali performing as a spokesman contender for the whole of the sportsmen of his and any era.  The affable side we also know and love. A master.  This is where the minutiae of live comes into crystal clear focus.  If we were able to see inside a bit more and discover the obvious and real demons – in the minds of al kinds Oscar sportsmen then this would have been a flyer.  That’s not to say it’s a dud.  Far from it.  It’s just that it got the canvas too many times.

John Graham

10 May 2017

Belfast
On at Queens Film Theatre from this Friday 12 May through to and including Thursday 18 May.  For Boxing fans a must.

Prevenge : A Film Review


Prevenge A Searingly Tragicomedy Slasher film set in London with a .vengeful Alice Lowe as Ruth in a prenatal state of fantasy.

Director. Alice Lowe. Screenplay by Alice Lowe. Cast.  Alice Lowe, Gemma Whelan, Kate Dickie, Jo Hartley. Music by Toydrum, (Pablo Clements and James Griffith), Cinematography Ryan Eddleston, Edited by Matteo Bini. Alice Lowe as Ruth, Jo Hartley as the Midwife,Gemma Whelan as Len, Kate Dickie as Ella, Kayvan Novak as Tom, Tom Davis as DJ Dan, Dan Skinner as Mr Zabek, Mike Wozniak as Josh, Tom Meeten as Zac.  Duration 1hr 27mins.  Cert. 15!  Others call it an 18!


Pre-Emptive Strike. (The Baby’s)

Alice Lowe writes, stars in, directs her first film in a genre which is fantasy comedic drama.  It is a twist of threads unraveling in her pre-birthing state.  In her womb is a child who has began life with a set of instructions from within.  A fierce moving story, set in built up London, of the advanced maternity state is advanced with a role play of murderous apparent revenge.  Playing Ruth whose partner has met his death in strange circumstances which are revealed incrementally.  The actual circumstances of how Ruth picks out her victims is slow to emerge, at least for me, it took a while to click with me.  Alice Lowe follows her work with Ben Wheatley in Sightseer’s a similar if slightly more tasteful black comedy set in the Lake District doing tourism no favours, alongside Steve Oram.  Having made this film in an incredible shooting over 11 days and with a script it took 2 days to write it is a remarkably fluent film.  The everyday language is heard giving it added authenticity even if it is a bit laden thick on the dark side humour wise. All baby manuals and prenatal, antenatal parenting and calming influences are set aside.  Oddly Ruth is holed up in a hotel and is routinely outdoors in pursuit of answers of some sort while she deals with the stress of losing her partner.  A birth is something which comes at a very bad time and she is catapulted into a bizarre bout of acting on hallucinatory presented thoughts of her yet to be born child.  The yet to be born girl is slightly robotic in speaking to her, we hear her voice and loud instructions, reprimands two a penny, with adult inflections mixed into her high pitched emotionally totemic voice.  Ruth is receptive and is in fact complicit in thinking all out there is not as intended and revenge is necessary for her peace.


Body talk

In the story she has a guide who is a Nurse, Jo Hartley as the Midwife, with her own bamboozingly off track advice.  Bodies and parts of them feature in scenes of unflinching acts of violence.  Ruth’s weapon of choice is a ten inch kitchen knife which she carries in her handbag. Ambidextrous she flits from having it in her left hand (for self preservation I was on the lookout for tell-tale signs – there are none!) to slitting throats with her right – not a spoiler as this is a slasher movie of gruesome ironic pulsating visceral brutality.  Alice Lowe is emotionally capable of appearing as all things and in only one aside – where a massive slasher movie trope is enacted in homage to the death living thing, make up is needed.  Her expressions manipulate with cruel ease.  ‘Acting’ is also deployed in Ruth’s skill set as one vengeful attack – partially – loosely based on baby’s dislike of free and selfish men which are identied in Ruth as users. The actual motive takes time to complete the circle for me at least. Ruth acts very smooth as a possible employee in a Pet Shop, where we start basically – even before the intro titles – as we visit the wildlife – caged – is that a possible motive? – with up close shots of lizards, and exotica for which the minutiae of living is also enrolled to kill (no pun intended) any a serial killer might induce.  While we move between the Nurse come Midwife who’s slightly suspecting of the difficulty Ruth may have dealing with things she only barely senses, Ruth is involved in this Police free slasher quest and pops up for her medical visits which she lays flat is poked and prodded, told about choices she has to make and stresses out when Social Workers are mentioned setting off alarm bells of adoption.  Unnamed ‘Midwife’ in our eyes should fear for her life.  The city is viewed sun shining out the hospital clinic window and untamed Ruth goes onto the next victim.


Symbolism

For a film to work for me it needs a component of symbolism meaning it is made with some kind of message or idea.  Inherent in this film is motherhood and giving life.  It commands a space where the maternal body is focussed on the life inside.  Into the equation comes a trauma and one actually involving a partner who is part of the child.  Transference of trauma and tragic outlook come in the shape of the unborn.  Hallucinations happen even outside chilbirth and obedience is as strong as is the fear of not taking control.  Ruth signals all the outward symbols of control but is deranged.  A fantasy has taken over.  In terms of exposing the trials of paternity and the variety of circumstances some of which deny the child life through abortion are held.  The only person who is able to control what is now part of her body is the woman and host to the life yet to reach the separation of life as a solitary being.  Into a set of circumstances a child requires love, nourishment, support and growth determined from its external cradle.  In even sense the film takes us on a course we’re the appropriate things happen in a caring society.  Withdrawl of parenthood in recognition of an incapability to raise a child in the way it deserves and warrants is seen as destructive in normal society. It is a course of least acceptance yet all kinds of situations present in the everyday to formulate and evaluate ways of bringing up orphaned, institutionalised children which are very specific and strange.  Unquestionably they are life altering for the child at the heart.  Ruth is shedding her identity by behaving as a victim casting of responsibility and is not her real self.  The extent to which she is displaced is treated here in a comedic vein.  By writing this while undergoing pregnancy herself any topics are thrown out there for us to swallow.  The strength of Alice Lowe is fixed into the story and it how it deflects from her own experience is unknown but is never far from development and it would be good to know how much she was informed about parenthood during the making of the film and any untangibles or brutal realities presented.


Performances

The casting of the film is immaculate and after a few out of focus moments, shaky handcam early doors, is very polished and with some of the mpre graphic scenes the work is in your face as slasher movies tend to be.  After the first (1 down) I looked about in shock and seeking similar reactions and they varied from open jaw to laughter to nonchalance. In the first instance the creepiness of No. 1 is ratcheted up with innuendo and you don’t quite see where it’s going.  The delivery in close confined spaces is edited extemelly well and balanced with the facial speech led story and we ponder the wildlife along with it.  We see the Scots actress Kate Dickie at one stage.  In Tom Geens Couple in a Hole she was unnervingly rich in character and bleakness and here she is playing the Boardroom executive with a cut throat (pun intended) intractable corporate kitten loving business head.  It goes on the block metaphorically speaking in a brilliantly acted and light touch subtlety acting thoroughly gripping and tense conveying a great piece of action.  There are other artful enriched performances and it is a film which is not slow and no hanging about while it progresses and materially gets worse as it is intensely an unstoppable mission.


Conclusion.  ###3

Tread careful you innocent viewers as this is packaged as being a brilliant debut, and it is, from an actress Alice Lowe, whose versatility is on show. I can’t see the bump as a very good prosthetic – can you – did she have a baby?  We deserve to know.  So I’ll tell you she was in her third trimester, it’s a new born.  It is insightful in lots of ways and has sufficient story morality – thin but present – dispatched to have us put rationality in its cross hairs and ask could something like this happen?  Obliquely the characters have lots of positives and negatives.  Some have said Ruth is a character you have no sympathy for.  I neither sympathised nor harangued her in terms of morality as it is no more than a very advanced form of horror come slasher film and pretentious are slight if at all present.  I derived a little from it but it was in terms of directorial excellence – at times – fidgety and broken – its over the top script – the performance of some who didn’t deserve their come up pence and the unparalleled lack of pursuit for the attacker.  No sirens only the lead.  It concludes as a well rounded story with a finalality bordering on normal but it is lacking in truth.

John Graham

8 February 2016

Belfast
On at QFT Queens Film Theatre from 10 February 2017 until 16 February 2017

I am not a serial killer : A Film Review


I am not a serial killer.

Director. Billy O’Brien. Produced by James Harris, Mark Lane, Billy O’Brien, Nick Ryan, Robbie Ryan. Screenplay by Christopher Hyde, Billy O’Brien.  Based on I Am Not a Serial Killer by Dan Wells.  Cast. Max Records, Laura Fraser, Christopher Lloyd, Christina Baldwin.  Music by Adrian Johnston, Cinematography Robbie Ryan, Edited by Nick Emerson.

I am not a serial killer delivers as a psychotic horror film set in a Mid West America small town called Clayton in a surprisingly luscious shocking and intensely entertaining way.  Shooting began in Virginia, Minnesota, on 28 February 2015. It premiered at the South by Southwest Film Festival on 13 March 2016.

Teenage kicks

It follows a teenage high school boy who lives with his Funeral Director Mum and business partner Margaret while he gains hands on experience of preparation of cadavers on the white ceramic lab table his Mum (Laura Fraser) uses to embalm the many corpses the small town accumulates.  Being allowed in the workspace is the first surprise.  Very much from the beginning a gore fest is imagined as coming at you.  The first, as the film opens,  is a murdered mechanic, 53 years old. In the opening scene and in typical Robbie Ryan cinematography we view the Maun Street from behind the yellow tape line as we observe the body being carted to the rear of the ambulance in broad daylight.  The mechanics slightly incomplete body makes it to the Funeral home via. the mortuary. Young John is midspace and closer and on his bike observing in Ryan’s long shot.  When the Ambulance departs a quip remark between the police officers and John set the ball rolling.  The basis though is kept to the real process without any directorial, script writing flannel.  A focus on the personalities develops with ease making this an enjoyable feast of detecting who are the good, bad and victims, perpetrators in the rollout of the – far enough away for it not to be our town melodrama, crime thriller.  But it is every town.


This Mortal Coil

As any youthful encounter with death might, this mortal coil contests young John played with ratcheting tension of his own uncertain derivation in a convincingly confronted boundary crossing boy.  A machine known as the pop up features as a character and is the solution stopping instrument doing the cathartic transformation enacted to preserve a corpse and have it melt in its own way back to dust once all sense of liquicication has gone.  The body returning to its earthly final resting place and through that portal of death to burial and.  John has few school friends given his macabre home situation.  The co-habiting women are diligent providers of a service not many would choose.

The thing is this is a special movie in the sense it delivers a story which seems so peculiar and natural as an adjunct to normal life.  Challenged by his headmaster early on when his essays are delivered with added mortal content, given his increasing expertise, John is asked to become more normal and John contests the premis he actually is not normal by reciting back to the headmaster the fact it is he who is defining normal by making John appear abnormal.  John is a near neighbour of the star of the film – Christopher Lloyd who could not be further from the Back to the Future wizard – playing a seemingly affable elderly gentleman whose routines are fairly, well routine and he displays a youthful vest full adoration of his homely wife and all seems fifty shades of normal.  William Cowper is a part which suits Christopher Lloyd so admirably.  He appears a shade frail and has gotten on into his dotage (in the film!).

There is a powerful underlying spirituality accumulating as the film progresses and through its numerous deaths.  Well you didn’t think I was unlikely to tell you there were several murdersnot just one and there is therefore a progression to the horror? After all a big clue in the setting of a boy in a family Funeral business is fairly indicative of where these well developed characters are going.  The other indicators are the Stephen King (esque) mentions, The Thing, the Halloween trailed at school where John turns up dressed as a Pierrot character subtexting it with lots of movies (hyjacked as previous films as a ‘Killer Clown’ stik) I prefer the Gerard Dillon multidimensional use of Pierrot in so much of his work and one (he was an artist born on the Falls Road in Belfast if anyone is asking) whose split mental state called on Pierrot in a lot of his work alongside Chagall influences.  Check them out.  We are invited into the cerebral John with his essays and his own self analysis.

  
We also get to know he is referred by his Doctor on the basis of therapy in his ‘fatherless’ environment to a young nerdy psychoanalyist played by the Irish actor Karl Geary with a hammy, a little irritating Irish/American droll, though it is most times buried by highly crafted psycobabble along side some incisive thoughts. On route we also get a bit of William Blake and have a Blake off (sic) recitative to which I will side step with this Blakeian wisdom as follows.  Blake saw us inhabiting a world with real spirits among us. They would be seen by him in fields among the workers picking crops, would be seen observing us from a tree, “their luminous wings, ‘bespangled every bough like stars.’”  It is something similar to another incident in another film I picked up on.  In it someone had died and responsibilities for the death were mixed.  While neither had caused the death both protagonists confessed to each other they couldn’t get the person out of their head, they were with them all the time. So maybe those ghosts linger if a resolution or reprieve can not be found.

This brings us onto the night time patrols that – as all vigilante style small town anguish descends into – ratcheting up our expectations of more gore.  We are not disappointed.  For me the middle section of the film dragged a little, as bodies themselves got dragged about.  I began thinking of how this Halloweeen, Thanksgiving, Christmas period movie might put people off their Christmas dinner but no.  Much bigger frights and scaryness lay ahead and believe me it was well worth the middle section wait.  It takes on very gripping tense narrative with the entire town becoming paranoid and the Bill character as alluded to earlier is much more than outward appearances suggest.  More split personalities and psycobabble is poured out.  Mum has another child to worry about an Emily, Johns sister eschews the family business for in deep witty contrast goth style rebelliousness.  At least someone sensible is around for ou counterfoil emotional baggage.  No it is perhaps the loafing young friend, perhaps Johns only friend, Nathan who is a nerdy but cool and clever moderator and even for his Dad who is a reactionary Hapless participant in tabloid, News channel hyped angst, Donald Trumps finest companion on the road to hell.


Colour my world. Colour is my world

Robbie Ryan and Director play on our need for progression with little vignettes of comedic black moments and we throughout get a CSI approved black gooey liquid slithering out and resting on each crime scene sans body.  The cinematic value of this contrast of body organs, fluids is astonishingly receptive to this quite unique visionary filmmaking technique showing us; on the one hand – just what I mean, and matterafactly, viscerally, body parts such as mortuary excavated organs, livers, lungs, heart, count them out count them in, – the afore mentioned black goo – the exchange of the darker blood from a cadaver with in the whirling flask sundae coloured ice cream pink red juice lovingly devoured by the lens and also through its plastic pipe progression returning to the body into carefully mechanically photographed sumblime choreography which will have people open eyed and mouth wide open such is the beauty and clarity of almost documentary style educational simplicity conveyed by Robbie Ryan and the pace orchestrated by our Director.

John Wayne Gary is also a sleuth and his detective edge gets him up close with murder.  “Fear is a really weird thing,”    “People are afraid of things, but they’re never afraid of their own actions.” The bestseller book of Dan Wells 2009 is itself comic and dark brought here with the teenager unafraid and possessing what are know as the three parts of the “Macdonald triad” predictors of violent sociopathy. Dr Neblin, Karl Geary, believes he is “a good person” unassuring for us.  Large irrating – it becomes stupidly expected of a nastie/horror film to inflict a dose of bikes, panda masks, clowns – in some of the steerage class plot liners come too much retro navel gazing antics.  It is unfortunate because the film has intuitive other worldy character transformative engagement and blackness enhanced with class 16mm cinematic bravado.  The Christening of a new Christmas horror ‘must watch‘ is sadly just falling off the newness factor in delivery.  Coming close but no palaver.  I kept looking for a dirty white van with ‘Don’t open these doors, there is a decomposing body inside.’ Something Johns Mum, Laura Fraser, might have asked him to draw as she is slightly unhinged not spotting the idiocy of training a teen in the dark and Strwberry Milkshake sundae arts of preparing corpses for ‘removal’ – we are taking you to your place of rest.  Enjoy.  Pick up a leaflet on your way out.

Good as many reviews have been with caustic deep referential content they mostly miss the purity of the act of dying and the momentary lapse only one – a psychotic unreal inhuman being – has any time for.  I think Billy O’Brien and Robbie Ryan choosing to stand off – far away in the first period – then closer implies they don’t get the catharchic experience.  Many a training outing with dark assassins missed probably which is unusually clever being Irish.  Frances McDormand sees them coming.


Don’t make me. Or your going up with Norman Greenbaum’s Spirit in the Sky.

Conclusion ####4

It makes it up to four courtesy of the new offerings.  While reservations on the Robbie Ryan familiar stand offish; at times, beautifully atmospheric locational driven camerawork and the wacky inclusion of nod after walked off nod to pluralist film tonality, tones it figures as a splendid creation.  Highly thoughtful and conflicting as to whether you blame anyone on John’s risky approach – is it his inherent fatherlessness heaping his own remit of boundary escaping and the simple motherly love which takes too many things at face value sometimes imperilling her as well as laying on thick the hard work of keeping the work balls in the air (metaphorical) and family cosyness stuffing the turkey for thanksgiving and presidents at Christmas it is a deserved success.  There is surely more work to come in this vein and Laura Fraser and Max Record provide award level leads with heaps of smaller characters excelling the call and pitching in cult like, the model of intention required as a sideline wack.  Taking of which one scene literally had me jump which takes some doing.  A sudden piece of unexpectedness.  For the hot of the film though you have to hand it to Christopher Lloyd whose Mr Bill Crowley will last very long in the memory and film analysts will be crawling over his every word and character development to see the nuanced stage and screen general occupy the space of .. you decide in a deranged horror film. Suspenseful for Christmas fare it is not – just a hyper realistic thriller becoming a drama of latitude.  Everything is resolved at the level of the earth not in the sky.

John Graham

15 December 2016

Belfast

See I am Not a serial killer on 19 December 20 December 21 December or and 22 December 2016 at QFT Belfast before going back at year end to see Donnie Darko.

The Box has arrived as you can see!

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See I am Not a serial killer on 19 December 20 December 21 December or and 22 December 2016 at QFT Belfast before going back at year end to see Donnie Darko.

The Box has arrived as you can see!

Room : A Film Review

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Director. Lenny Abrahamson. Canada and Ireland Production.
Cert. 15. 1hr 58mins.
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Brie Larson as Joy “Ma” Newsome, Jacob Tremblay as Jack Newsome
Joan Allen as Nancy Newsome, William H. Macy as Robert Newsome
Sean Bridgers as Old Nick, Megan Park as Laura
Cas Anvar as Dr. Mittal, Amanda Brugel as Officer Parker
Joe Pingue as Officer Grabowski, Tom McCamus as Leo
Wendy Crewson as Talk Show Host. From the cast list you get the impression, correctly, this movie involves more than the two principals though they both excell and exceed all else about them. Jacob Trembly, is outstanding an intuitive as kids can be in depicting the central persona and how he has put himself in the character is for later enquirer to find out. In final credits after long thanks etc the names Christina and Jacob Tremblay are credited. This is appreciative of the real mother and son relationship on which film making is entrusted.
Suspended beliefs.                                                                                                                                                                                            This film adaption of the award winning best selling Emma Donaghue novel of the same name is a traumatic retelling of the narrative which has some linearity with actual abduction and hostage situations.image  Those of lone kidnap victims living long periods in isolation.  Some of mother and child situations, of several separated but confined in close proximity to each other.  Each and every one placed in a small environment year on year becoming part and element of the space they occupy.  Some carry memory and experience.  Knowledge alone is suspended and time has no authority or purpose as incarceration means endless endured living and existence. We are not in Ireland but everytown, for this, the film makers have taken us across an Ocean presumably to attract and it did, the American audience.  Fear travels.  The rewards are just lining up as this is an awesome traumatic drama by anyone’s stretch of template.
Noun
This is Room.  The noun is solitary throughout as other words tend to be. Wardrobe, Chair 1 and Chair 2.  Sink is attached to a wall.  Wall is sink wall.  Each object is a solitary item in isolation within the mind of Jack and his mother Joy played by with startling realism by Brie Larson who bears a striking resemblance to another of my favourite and compelling actresses, Marion Cottilard, for which she just this week received a deserved Golden Globe for her performance in this role. 
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The story is told from around the fifth birthday, no going back to how events arose or flashback is used making this very much a time conscious movie having some element of time passing observed and carried forward.  We are soon approaching the birthday and the story is developed by director Lenny Abrahamson on the basis of the screenplay put in place by Emma Donaghue herself. This is not a case of control freakery but the authorship creating during the writing a vision of what it might make as a film.  Diligently and eloquently the nuances, the said and unsaid scenes of the depiction of a mind being manipulated into a state of acceptance of Room as being the whole of existence is virtually incomprehensible from our perspective. However it is incredibly immersive. Twelve Angry men was directed in a jury room and similarly this is using objects and spatial awareness to engulf us in Room.  The film set for half the film.
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Hostage
Many themes of outlier satellite themes are in the tenure of film making from Dogma themes? Captive, The Town, Misery maybe, and portals through which we may pass along a Yellow brick road or into outer space and parallel universes or as the allusion and plot device premise utilised – a copy of Alice in Wonderland happens to be one of the objects in Room.  Thoughts of escape conjured up by the mild mannered costumeir David Jones nee Bowie of this world has entered to be free.        The young Brixton Jewish lad who once made Berlin his home and declared the world Low.  Lazarus arisen. Isolation. In Bowie’s words “Look up here I’m in heaven.  I can’t be seen.” It’s as if this is a place outside of the world, a transition space knowing and eating into the psyche of Joy who sees no way out. So many depictions yet none prepare you for what you will see or be absorbed in with this film which is instantly unsettling and grows adding weight to trauma heartfelt and witnessed.  To say it is claustrophobic merely scratches at raw cliche.  
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Room is a habitat of ten feet by ten feet which is usually the dimensions of a prison cell and it is within a shed.  
Silence observed
Lined with cork tiles,acoustic lined it is a forbidden tomb like abode.  Nature enters through a skylight as seasons come and go.  Night comes after day and electricity is feed into Room and captor ‘Old Nick’ provides pictures through a TV set envisioning a two dimensional external world.  A world simply of people who are flat and have coloured faces.
Sky
The captor is a loner, played by Sean Bridgers, with a psychotic control power urge which he initially inflicts on Amy by kidnapping her and fathering, as meanings extrapolate, Jack. He enters Room frequently when Jack is at rest, most of the time.                    As Jacks birthday appears he asks mum for a present and is markedly confused he does not get the meaning of need and want.  Amy has objectives to keep both sane and her own personality is bearing down on her with questions of how to manage the situation when the captor continually abuses her and increasingly becomes less predictable and habitual.

Needs must when the devil drives and Amy begins to determine ways of solving the problem.
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There is a plot constructed by Joy and she calls on Jack to make believe once she has become more open about true existence.  In the course of living in Room Amy is required to develop the concept of the outside world which she does painfully and struggles as Jack does to create an imaged but believable world.  One which Jack can trust is not another lie given all before will become a lie. This is a transition which is a form of enlightenment.  Concepts of good and multiple universes come into play.  The stars are visible in the skylight but the near world isn’t. To boldly go where etc. becomes a reality and a necessity.

How they attempt to escape this is alluded to in trailers and the book is known to have outcome.  We come to the narrative expecting all sorts of possible outcomes all which involve mental and physical brutalised people. The deadliest harm and sick frequently encountered plots and reality themes are distinctly carried in the narrative with jeopardy ever present and lingering as we empathise from a totally inexperienced point of view of the flesh and blood people whose ‘lives’ we, during the film have become wrapped up in.

For the second half of the film this experience becomes reversed and unsettling.  The trauma continues as the world enters in.  To their lives and width of space expands and multiples of universes are presented.  How will their previously controlled, manipulated minds cope?  Amys mind has been also been shut away and her ‘rebirth’ is agonising and presents questions arising from the people she left behind and whose life’s have themselves inevitably changed.  Changing because of despite of her incarceration? This new boy a child Jack they never knew is in the new world.image
Love, freedom, perseverance
Parents, William H Macy plays Joy’s father now grandfather with ragged tousled grimacing being his reactive state and Joan Allen plays his estranged wife and Mum wonderfully, living with a new partner Tom McCamus as Leo. Macy seems to play troubled Mr Normal a lot of the time and though this is an every town movie successful crossing the Atlantic to Toronto of all places it is duty bound to throw up an Everyman to give the plot and the reader guidance.  Remarkably it works extraordinarily well with a line which struck me; and it occurs from a source which could be any character, has some insightfulness though not necessarily always, so to speak a level playing field.  It is the observation – “No one lives their life like nothing happened.  This (living) is one extraordinary happening and set of events.” Or words to that effect!
Conclusion ##### 5.
Other places. Remain the same.
There is something not spiritual about the film and probably the book but it would be impossible if not implausible not to think about duality and spirit of another guidance and driven existence on the other side in consideration with this film.    It is not prescient, co-incidental, interesting, telling that David Bowie has gone on a journey from which no escape is possible or no eventuality presents but it provokes thinking along the lines that Jack is a Child who fell to Earth.  Eventually we all leave the cinema or our front rooms matterafactly with a new idea or two derived from thinking having read or seen unsettling stories light our minds for a period.  The wardrobe of the universe is beginning to unravel before our eyes and we can but gaze in wonder and be a thankful witness.  Room is in several places at once without leaving our heads.  It conveys the brutality and fragility of existence and disassembled change brought about for God knows whatever reason.  Fate and fortune, misfortune and grace are all consuming and this is a very accomplished way of exploring the journey made and happenstance of lives. 

Opening on 15 January in the United Kingdom and at
Queens Film Theatre Belfast from this Friday 15th January 2016.

Runs throughout Remainder of January until 28th at QFT.
SEE http://www.queensfilmtheatre.com for details of times etc.
It heralds a new season of films and 2016 begins with this relatively mainstream movie in the period for awards and Queens Film Theatre as well as a plethora of Art House movies will be bringing more of these mainstream films along in the early part of the years programming. Already it plays out The Danish Girl which has been pulling in audiences and if you want to see ROOM BE SURE TO ARRIVE EARLY AND OR BOOK as I predict it will have audiences queuing up to see it. It truly is a remarkable movie and many praises should be heaped on Emma Donaghue for pulling the material all together so lucidly and engrossingly. Irish Film is in good shape as storytelling triumphs.

John Graham

13 January 2016

Belfast

Remembering David Bowie also
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It Follows : A Film Review

Dir: David Robert Mitchell. Starring: Maika Monroe, Keir Gilchrist, Jake Weary, Olivia Luccardi. 94 min.
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Wicked.
The terrifying thing that is the teenage mind adjusting to a largely unknown inexperienced world. Born in the USA is a paradise for the horror genre.
Firstly the terrifying Brady Bunch and all the generalities made can be chewed up and spat out with undue repentance to harm and the devil take the hindmost John Carpenter sense of freedom of suspense driven drama.

Spooky and hooky all the teenager vulnerabilities are played upon with a force and vitality which brims with jeopardy.

The horror opens as the child becoming a teenager in an instant, Maika Monroe as Jay , takes on and into her life through the opening terrifying incident at her home, the stricken future promised to her by this it thing.
It is the shape of things to come.

Deliciously and delightfully the standard United States of America suburban landscape is visited once again, not by hurricanes, the industrial implosion, the swathes of reposed houses and the shopping mall culture but by the vicissitudes of the any town pathway between the green blades scorn to a certain height. Even Dallas Buyers Club had this suburban presence.
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The landscape is purposely the container of more than.
Landscape
The film club wishing for reality through the morality of recent movies from Twelve Years a Slave, Selma, Boyhood, Still Alice, Her, The Theory of Everything, even Dallas Buyers Club and with relevance here drawn to the studious Under the Skin – identified here! In a previous critique as a certain cult classic is restorative like a new age enlightenment – showing the questions are astute and plentiful.
Oscar my dear
Julianne Moore has secured an deserved Oscar. So many years a custodian of the woman’s voice of filmic portrayal of – remember the Short Cuts legacy as a reality check. We are in a period of perturbed America. Still Alice is persuasively what the title projects and Julianne portrays.

Unexplained It Follows is a Horror movie of studious independence and holds no golden moment of revelation so standing apart from this reality fix found across the Film industry.

This should be a modest box office for its (normal meaning inferred) set of deserving collaborators. The credit list for extras is practically the entire roll call of a school which I didn’t see coming but shows these days everybody counts.
Horror maketh the known
Except it is all a lie over a truth never revealed.
Not when the puerile lapped up diet of Sniper and the passable comedic escapism of sentimental passage of youth films which are every young persons diet of cinematic large screen initiation.
We of later years use cinema for different purposes. Listening to the traffic of themes passing we are underwhelmed often by genre pics.

That said this is a film intelligently drawn and delivered. It is widescreen America as well as the manicured lawns of middle America. The claustrophobic nuanced interior life’s are quickly brought to the filmgoers attention with the preoccupation with the ordinary disrupted.
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Director excels
The writer-director, David Robert Mitchell has excelled in adding to the stalker in every guise and at every possible inconvenient moment.
The pass it on theme is quickly up and running.
Is it running in the terrified mind of the teenager, is it a part or deposit of life which must be cast off or erased? The horror requires an entourage to protect the followed Maika Monroe. They come in the form of her friends with a newish older friend whose few years advantage later becomes a more assured voice of the possible reach of the follower.
Nighty Nighty
Firstly there has to be, one third in the sleepover to stay within the home of dreaded encounter. The sleepover follows on from the Educational Campus of State education. The Pavlovian essentials of the locked doors and the experience within and between the walls is extremely well delivered and built around the experience only being felt initially by Maika Monroe.
The Relay of Horror.
And then some. It is on the prowl and becomes the unseen except by the Maika playing visually her literal disturbed self with deft darkness and dark sorrowful eyes often wet with crying. Her mind implants these figures as we see them getting closer and closer in their relationship to herself. They are progressively from her past.

The old woman who appears early I was unsure of, except it being Carpenteresque. The indulgences only heighten Horror movies it (normal use) seems, it is the enhanced carried knowledge. Like a relay of Horror. I love this exhibit of entailing dragging film cross fertilisation. In terms of Under the Skin we are between the lens and film, between the innovation of inverted thought. The prospect of reading in our purview these recollected reflections are very artfully profound occurrences. This is what the Croneburg, chronological contextual shifting verb and adjective. The piece of derision laden depiction of failed and troubled humanity is absolutely spine tingling in places when it gathers on the senses.

DisasterPieces is the music ensemble that delivers a score which is modern tone shifting tension riven rifts and shifts true and plentiful. It requires it’s auditory piercing stabbing, point making double six hit. It carries.

The work becomes a journey between past places revisiting the past and the left behind desolated part of any town another place destroyed and the reverse side of the coin.

The deeper reading of this is the stripped back past place which is in the present time replaced by relative comfort.
It may represent the Troll. After I was musing on the internalised Ibsen like influence of narrative taken along a path. Such as the Wild Duck. The inescapable place within that we reside alongside buffered by the use of conformity as well as the device of useful escape mechanisms.
Ibsen Ipso Facto
Why did the mind attack Maika Monroe so? Why do the appearances occur within one without another. They are alone not shared (often the genre requires bulk packaging so resorts to it it The Damned etc.!) there you have it – one genre deconstructed as I do with the mighty Ibsen once more my compelling lead to this place.
The Lady from the Sea anyone?

Talking of which water and swimming feature. There is a visit to a pool and you can mix music with water.
Local band featured here are Go Swim. They are cool to explore the water environment but the film takes on water in an entirely unmethaphorical way. It provides the close to dangerously good cinema wished for but shocking in its effect.
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For Go Swim Go See.

Death of the Pilgrim? Death of the Follower? Death of the Followed?

The irredeemable inexhaustible truth is that before long someone else will be along with an even better version of the stalker as self or unself.

To visit the place first try the widescreen of the world.

Conclusion. ###+ 3+
How is the shape of the film let of the hook by being similar in its (normal use) trace to Horror films familiar and of the recent past?
The famille is everything for the genre. The psychosis a very confrontational deep dish. We eat of the plate from the forest floor and survive the increasing complexities and more conflicting stories the senses take in.

This is a film with plenty of shocks and conveyed terror. It is not a slasher context movie but handled with dexterity and skillful ness by its young cast, the exception being the old lady whose part is all make-up! And a meander through the sets. This is a continuum narrative with no (apparent) flashback. It follows the film is a notable watch. Be watchful.

John Graham

26 February 2015

Belfast
The purview is laid out in the shape of cartoons storybooks, space age science interlocked to the bourgeois system that divides down the line whatever your background the curriculum becomes you unless your mind has opened

What is more terrifying than growing up believing the World is a b