Containment : A Film Review


Containment

Just this past week the Hinckley Point, Somerset, Nuclear reactor was given the go-ahead on behalf of the United Kingdom population, by Theresa May, Prime Minister, following a false standoff with Chinese and French providers since her elevation internally by a group of her party seeing her fit to govern us, a new found ability to take decisions. This is a decision which should never have been made to be taken. With the daily occurrence advances in battery technology and solar power retention and storage from that huge object we know as the Sun, it is within a very short time very likely we will individually at our homes or collective of homes have our own power stations. Nano transformation of energy which allied to similar advances in motive power shall also have an effect of reducing carbon output. Berlin is now a zero carbon city for example so where are the British in this revolution?

Documentary

Containment A Film made in 2015 by Directors, Peter Galston and Robb Moss. It is film documentary on Nuclear waste production and storage. The USA/Japan co-production brings forward the extent of Nuclear waste currently abroad in what is basically a state of deadly toxic limbo.

Getting to screen it.

Interested in bringing Containment to your community, conference, festival or campus? Share your details here at containmentmovie.com or email us (them!) at containment@filmsprout.org, and we’ll (they’ll!) be in touch right away!


Framework
The first frames show Fukishima and a woman walking alone seen by the cameraman/woman surveying the limbo state this empty city has become. It alone needs a containment scenario this film addresses elsewhere in the Art graphic animation discourse for a place in the USA. New Mexico. When did the first scenario arise?

It begins by pointing to the Cold war period after the second word war, when nuclear warheads were accumulated and agreements placed to disarm these weapons of destruction by putting them into vast radioactive ‘landfill’ sites comprising mainly a site in New Mexico whose irrational acceptance as a location for a nuclear waste dump defies logic. The terrain was chosen primarily because of its geological fingerprint. It was a location with a vast unique strata of salt which millennia had proven stable and a medium in which a frozen ‘time’ capsule could be maintained. It had the hallmarks of having the capacity of being an enevelope for storing the radioactive sludge. However the bunds and lagoons created on top of it were and still are reservoirs of storage for a hundred million gallons of toxic waste. This means of storage is but one part of the cycle which includes other non-associated methods which involve inward shipping of nuclear waste in vessels – carefully checked when transport protection is removed for leaks. Each vessel is thoroughly x-rayed for casing integrity. Watching the magic gieger-counter being waved by an operative circling each container begged the question had they replaced the batteries in it. From this part of the process it then went sub-strata via. a long passage of tunnels by vehicle to hopefully it’s final resting place and presumably back filled at some juncture. Other processes included pouring liquid nuclear waste via. robotic arms manually operated into glass containers. Giant Kindle jars of high tech composition presumably.


The only problem is they remain mostly in their last location since a shut-down after a freak accident when a material failure allowed leakage to occur from a container – it’s past x-Ray and scrutiny failing to identify ahead of time any possible flaws or defects – which in turn jeopardized operatives and future containment activities. The decision was to put the entire site under lockdown and begin a clean up operation estimated at the time to be in the region of $300 million dollars or was that billions? In any event nowhere on earth is capable of storing the material waste China America Middle Eastern and European countermoves have plans to accumulate never mind that already stockpiled and in state of transition limbo.


Deep concerns

The film is concerned with not only the accumulation as well as a key part the Fukushima meltdown catastrophe which we are shown in its raw elemental state as a no-go locality but with the figurative signaling beyond our times into periods frankly inconceivable, ten thousand years hence and multiplications thereof. The means of alerting ‘others’ unaware of the backstory our history are explored in real time exercise a of futurist projections. Cockamamie American pawn brokering is one way of describing it. Put it in as a trade and see if any idiot will buy it.


The film becomes cartoon depictions crudely fascinatingly naive ventures of our humanity expressed as a vent diagram and delineation of rogue versus alien versus well the ordinary Joe or Jane whose curiosity got the better of them. Pictorial semaphore signals as used by pirates might have easily substituted or maritime signals heralded by symmetry as unnatural presence of danger put in place by those previously occupying earth. Ie. Humans.


Other reviews.

How do you plan 10,000 years in advance? Containment asks whether we are adequately caring for future generations with current storage methods for radioactive waste. A visit to the nuclear ghost towns of Fukushima shows what will happen if we fail.

—Karl Mathiesen, The Guardian

Peter Galison and Robb Moss remind us of the lingering threat of radioactive waste. What to do with it? How can we warn people centuries in the future about the danger of waste disposal sites? With inventive animation and incisive reporting, Moss and Galison aren’t going to make it any easier to sleep at night.

—Peter Keough, The Boston Globe

The film…attempts to articulate the beautiful and complicated problem of how to render the future a part of the present. It offers glimpses of a future beyond our societal imagination…and goes beyond ordinary documentary filmmaking to bring forward this future image into the minds and sensibilities of its viewers. It is in attempting this communication with the audience beyond the here and now that the film has its greatest success.

—Zoe Jones, Spook Magazine

I admire Containment for its zealous questioning of a situation that is ignored, misunderstood, and obviously—thanks in part to this film—urgent. I’ve been thinking about 10,000 years from now ever since.

—Erin Trahan, WBUR’s The ARTery and The Independent Magazine

The way we tell stories about who we are, what we did and how we considered the consequences of our actions is moving and profound in Containment, told with investigative care, sadness, fury and poetry.

—Andrew Lattimer, heyuguys.com


Three titles making their world premieres at Full Frame garnered plenty of buzz…Containment, Peter Galison and Robb Moss’ latest documentary, also taps into another controversy magnet—nuclear power. The directing duo aren’t strangers to hot-button topics. Their 2008 Sundance hit Secrecy chronicled the massive efforts by the U.S. government to classify data from the general population. Containment, about the scientific, moral and philosophical problems that surround the disposition of nuclear waste, is sure to spark a national debate.

—Addie Morfoot, Variety

Alarmingly frank but refreshingly optimistic, Containment tells a great many inconvenient truths but its coda assures us that all is not lost. The future will come, but we will endure.

—Phil W. Bayles, oneroomwithaview.com

Where did I see it? – this list shows its progress.

Pittsburgh Filmmakers and Remembering Hiroshima, Imagining Peace, Pittsburgh, PA — August 5, 2016

Pilgrim Legislative Advisory Coalition, Jones River Landing, Kingston, MA — August 20, 2016

CBK Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands — September 3–November 27, 2016

Virginia Tech Research Center, Arlington, VA — September 8, 2016

Case Western Reserve University, Physics Department Colloquium, Cleveland, OH — September 15, 2016

Queen’s Film Theatre, Belfast, UK — September 17, 2016

Department of History, Brown University, Providence, RI — September 21, 2016

Willard Straight Theatre, Cornell Cinema, Ithaca, NY — September 27, 2016


Conclusion ###3

A loose three is attributed to this as the central theme of Containment is heavily here approached using an Art based form of narrative.  This in itself is a very lame element.  It practically philosophies about different advanced and abstract notions.  It focuses while doing this on the processes involved in capture storage and transportation to a location with interviews, protocols of public meetings and the personalities in ‘local’ politics making huge global impacting decisions.  Maybe the highest rank of Government was County Official.  No Presidential, No Congressman, No State Govenor is addressed.  Why not?  Didn’t want to speak? Unsuprisingly? So instead why not make cartoon versions of supposed dialogue and their answers to the Containment question so artistically examined?  Except the artistic endeavors are in my mind not even at the level of a third year student of Architecture whose grasp would no doubt evaluate the obvious pros-cons of symbolic gestural, linguistic, extra-terrestrial scenarios and much more as established throughout mainstream sci-fi non-fictional examinations and the plethora of commentary overloading the Internet from one campus to the Daily News in Singapore or Daily Comet in New York.

Point Blank Failings

I am afraid it lets the fundamental differences of responsibility being attributed to the decisions made in Nations which ignore this Containment issue.  The commentary is not validated while a ‘Nuclear’ Authority speaking as a Police(woman) whose role oversaw protocols and practices came nowhere close to the target.  A question of where possible ‘dangers’ – the plain direction of the conversation marked out terrorism as a principle if not top concern, – got lamely tossed back as ‘Couldn’t possibly answer/speculate!’ kind of moderation the film should not even allow as any direction of investigative informative journalism.
Take a look at the website for additional and valuable source material as the film is only part of a projected discourse and is a beginning – as far as ‘multiple locations’ arise by example through the stark reality of Fukishima.  Mr Nissan is interesting and in a semi-comatose state as his life is Groundhog Day – this is an insight in itself but only, only a miniscule part of what is required to be examined and dealt with by Governments and activists post UN interventions which are of a Human Disater reactive kind not fundamentally addressing ongoing Nuclear exploitation for Billions of dollars/yen/euros of Business.  It’s about the money stupid.
John Graham

21 September 2016

Belfast.

Retina Rejuvenated: Health

image
 
Optogenetics
 (from Greek optikós, meaning “seen, visible”) is a biological technique which involves the use of light to control cells in living tissue, typically neurons, that have been genetically modified to express light-sensitive ion channels.

Here is an astonishing insight from The Expotential Investor whose interests are frequently science based and explore the direction of travel in pioneering research and hopefully advances of universal benefit.

Here goes with an example text. I thought I should share it with you.  The words in italics are the authors and are a a Money Week subscribed free e-mail to which you can subscribe. See footer.

———————————————————————————————–

Exponential Investor
A step into the unknown…

24 February 2016

By Nick O’Connor

Deep breaths everyone.
In today’s Exponential Investor we’re going to take a step into the unknown – and explore an emerging branch of science with vast potential (both for the world and for us as investors). 

It’s called optogenetics. 

Never heard of it? 

Don’t worry. By the end of today’s letter you’ll not only know what it is – you’ll see why it’s causing such a stir in the scientific and medical communities and why March could be a breakout month for this hitherto unknown branch of science.
Let’s dive straight in.

The convergence

Our story starts, rather strangely, with the study of algae. 
The fact that algae give off light has been known for thousands of years. As Charles Darwin put in his diary while travelling aboard the HMS Beagle:
The sea presented a wonderful and most beautiful spectacle. There was a fresh breeze, and every part of the surface, which during the day is seen as foam, now glowed with a pale light… As far as the eye reached, the crest of every wave was bright, and the sky above the horizon, from the reflected glare of these vivid flames, was not so utterly obscure, as over the rest of the heavens.
That was nearly two centuries ago. Yet it’s only in the last hundred years or so that we’ve learnt how algae do this. 
But it wasn’t until the 1970s that we made a breakthrough that led to the birth of optogenetics. 
The details of the discovery involve the kind of science that makes my brain ache, so I’ll give you the short version. Scientists found that certain algae contain proteins that respond directly to a light source. This enables them to detect and move toward light. 
Put simply, we found that light itself can be the catalyst for cellular change, rather than a chemical reaction. That opened the door to the idea of using light as a kind of wireless transmitter to bring about biological change.
But it wasn’t until this idea converged with the advent of genetic therapy that the field of optogenetics was born.
See, genetic therapy allows us to transplant the gene responsible for responding to light as a stimulus in algae into other living things (first animals like mice, and more recently humans – we’ll get to that in a second). 
This is all a rather long winded way of explaining what optogenetics is, which is essentially modifying genes so that they’re responsive to light. That may not sound like a big deal. But the implications are immense. 
It means we can use light – or certain frequencies of it – as a catalyst for biological change in the human body. 
That goes far beyond making your skin glow when you shine a light on it. 
Take, for instance, your brain.
Making a change inside the human brain is complex and dangerous. For a long time it involved using electrodes to trigger cellular change. But that wasn’t precise enough for many procedures. According to a special report on optogenetics by Nature Methods:
In 1979 Francis Crick suggested that the major challenge facing neuroscience was the need to control one type of cell in the brain while leaving others unaltered. As electrodes cannot be used to precisely target defined cells and drugs act much too slowly, Crick later speculated that light might have the properties to serve as a control tool, but at the time neuroscientists knew of no clear strategy to make specific cells responsive to light.
Optogenetics is the solution to that problem. 
It means we can make very precise changes to cells within the brain by using light as a catalyst. For example, in one experiment at Stanford University, researchers found that they could switch off the sensation of fear in mice by shooting light through a fiber optic cable at specific cells in their brains.
Put aside whether it’s useful to switch fear off, for a second, and just think about that as a scientific achievement. It means we can manipulate complex cellular actions wirelessly, using light as the sole trigger. 
Which, as you can imagine, has made optogenetics one of the hottest emerging technologies of the last decade. For a graphic illustration of that, take a look at the explosion of uses of the term in scientific literature below: 

Source: Optogenetics by Keith Deisseroth, Nature Methods

There are myriad ways in which the field of optogenetics is developing. I’ll return to the subject again in the future and look at some of them. But before I leave you, I wanted to highlight one particular optogenetic study likely to make headlines in the next month or so. 
Teaching the blind to see

You see, one particular use of optogenetics could be to restore the sight of blind people.

In fact, the very first human test of optogenetics involves a team of researchers in Texas transplanting the DNA of light sensitive algae into legally blind patients. The idea is to use the light entering the eye naturally to trigger a response within nerve cells and send electronic signals to the brain. MIT Technology Review has the story:
The study, sponsored by a startup called RetroSense Therapeutics, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, is expected to be the first human test of optogenetics, a technology developed in neuroscience labs that uses a combination of gene therapy and light to precisely control nerve cells.
The trial, to be carried out by doctors at the Retina Foundation of the Southwest, will involve as many as 15 patients with retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative disease in which the specialized light-sensitive photoreceptor cells in the eye die, slowly causing blindness. The aim of the treatment is to engineer the DNA of different cells in the retina, called ganglion cells, so that they can respond to light instead, firing off signals to the brain.
According to reports, that trial should get under way very soon. The results are expected to be “a gold mine” for future studies, according to neuroscientist Antonello Bonci. 
I’ll keep an eye out for the results. But in the meantime, keep a lookout for any other optogenetic breakthroughs. This is an emerging new discipline with vast potential. There are likely to be some major opportunities – and ultimately a lot of money – to be made as it matures.
Just remember – you heard it here first!

All the best, 

Nick O’Connor

Publisher, Exponential Investor


P.S. We haven’t talked much about genetics and biotechnology much yet in Exponential Investor. But we’ll be ramping up our coverage a lot in the coming weeks and months – there’s a huge amount of potential here. If there’s any particular topic you think is worth us looking at, just get in touch with me at nick@moneyweek.com.

 Exponential Investor is published by MoneyWeek Research Limited

MoneyWeek Research Ltd 

—————————————————————————————————–
image
This is the Stanford University USA research paper synopsis.

   
    
 
John Graham

24 February 2016

Belfast

Science : Quantum Universe and Entanglement

 Our Material Universe

The Scientist has been writing again giving their insight to the material universe. My name for it as the step outside material involves time and non material things we know little of.

Here’s the Scientists latest post.

Can the idea of quantum entanglement explain the world or replace the metaphysics?

This peculiar phenomenon causes two or more particles to share a common feature which cannot be described individually. One requirement in quantum mechanics is that the described object/particles are be able to exists in two states simultaneously. This means if we have two objects pointing upwards and downwards at a same time, a measurement that determines the state of the object will project it to one of the two possibilities at random. Now if there is a pair of these and entangled, a measurement on one object determines the potential rest of second object independent of how far they are from each other.

It’s not wrong to say that there’s a quantum world, it’s the whole world including ourselves.

World of this kind goes back to Aristotle, where there is a polarity of an individual things, which characterised by intrinsic properties of each.

End of the day the nature can only be explained as whole through us and through every pieces in us.

(This I understand to be the passage of neutrinos and our composition through and in it.)
New Quantum Theory Could Explain the Flow of Time is a wired.com essay which brings together many aspects.

 

 

Such as :

Not to mention a bit of philosophy.

According to the scientists, our ability to remember the past but not the future, another historically confounding manifestation of time’s arrow, can also be understood as a buildup of correlations between interacting particles. When you read a message on a piece of paper, your brain becomes correlated with it through the photons that reach your eyes. Only from that moment on will you be capable of remembering what the message says. As Lloyd put it: “The present can be defined by the process of becoming correlated with our surroundings.”

The backdrop for the steady growth of entanglement throughout the universe is, of course, time itself. The physicists stress that despite great advances in understanding how changes in time occur, they have made no progress in uncovering the nature of time itself or why it seems different (both perceptually and in the equations of quantum mechanics) than the three dimensions of space. Popescu calls this “one of the greatest unknowns in physics.”

More

“We can discuss the fact that an hour ago, our brains were in a state that was correlated with fewer things,” he said. “But our perception that time is flowing — that is a different matter altogether. Most probably, we will need a further revolution in physics that will tell us about that.” of space. Popescu calls this “one of the greatest unknowns in physics.”

This is extracted from the wired.com article.

“We can discuss the fact that an hour ago, our brains were in a state that was correlated with fewer things,” he said. “But our perception that time is flowing — that is a different matter altogether. Most probably, we will need a further revolution in physics that will tell us about that.”

News has reached me of the source of the alpha beta particle names.
Lord Rutherford of New Zealand.

image

Lord Rutherford

Research and Discoveries

In 1895, as the first research student at the University of Cambridge’s Cavendish Laboratory in London, Rutherford identified a simpler and more commercially viable means of detecting radio waves than had been previously established by German physicist Heinrich Hertz.

Also while at Cavendish Laboratory, Rutherford was invited by Professor J.J. Thomson to collaborate on a study of X-rays. German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen had discovered X-rays just months before Rutherford arrived at Cavendish, and X-rays were a hot topic among research scientists. Together, Rutherford and Thomson studied the effects of X-rays on the conductivity of gases, resulting in a paper about dividing atoms and molecules into ions. While Thomson went on to examine what would later be called an electron, Rutherford took a closer look at ion-producing radiations.

Focusing on uranium, Rutherford discovered that placing it near foil resulted in one type of radiation being easily soaked up or blocked, while a different type had no trouble penetrating the same foil. He labeled the two radiation types “alpha” and “beta.” As it turns out, the alpha particle was identical to the nucleus of a helium atom. The beta particle was, in fact, the same as an electron or positron.

John Graham

22 December 2015

Belfast

The Wonder of Science : Neutrinos

image
It is a week without a film to review though I watched on a large screen the film about the Stasi ‘The lives of others’ which is not exactly fun (unlike Goodbye, Lenin) but is one very strong piece of important believable cinematic narrative.

So instead I put over a piece of science news after this intro.

The Nobel Prize for Literature, it was just announced, went to a lady – one of the few if any to receive this particular award, from Belarus where the leader this weekend achieves his mandate with a thoroughly extraordinary 95% or thereabouts vote. Her novel is a fictional/non-fictional – you decide re telling of interviews following her earlier use of the form and you can find the details by looking at the Nobel Prize website links.

Nobel Acknowledgement
CND is not Corbans New Democracy or indeed Can Nuclear Deliver but was a symptom of the Cold War standoff which concerned our lack of control over Nuclear fusion and what is now called Nuclear Proliferation.
‘Nations’ are already armed to the hilt across the planet to make meaningless any strategic inroads to depletion of stocks of nuclear functioning weaponry.

So it comes as no significant shortfall that one declaration of world wide scientific and other knowledge based and intellectual achievement comes under the temple of Nobel patronage. The Swedish scientists institution for awards was started after his death in 1896 in 1901 from largely arms derived finances and it scopes out a plateau of highest achievement in several fields as judged by peers and experts of suitable standing.

Into this piece of world demography comes this year the award in the field of Physics recognition of the discovery made in the crust of the earth – so far down as to avoid the interference of earth surface radiation or any kind of radiation that became the foundation of work leading to the breakthrough discovery of what happens to the energy emitted by the Sun as electro neutrinos as it crosses the universe to earth.

Prof. Kajita and McDonald win the Nobel prize.
The leading researchers at Japan’s super-kamiokande and Canada’s Sudbury Neutrino Observatories were studying neutrinos coming from cosmic rays and Sun for nearly two decades. These neutrinos are created from supernova explosion, from death of stars, to reactions in nuclear power plants and naturally occurring radioactive decays. (Para quotes my mystery scientist!)

All calculations previously opined 2/3 of the energy had dissipated in some way or been neutrialised on its journey but how?

It seems it on leaving the Sun or as any other expulsion like a death star there is a conversion into two other types of neutrinos.

Australians, even those Rugby playing types you see demolishing teams on the way to placing an Ovid shaped ball at the opposite end of the field or pitch known as the tryline call a Sunbeam an unused kitchen utensil left over at the end of the barbecue or what other means of food consumption they happen to be indulging in.

No the Sunbeam or Sunray to be specific is both heat and light from the Sun which is about 93,000,000 miles away. (I remember the day our science teacher at school pretended to calculate from the clinker covered hockey pitch on day the sun could be seen in our northern location, the distance with a rather large tee square he someone managed to lift out of the drawing masters class without him realising, and with a string and blackboard diagram by trigonometry ascertain its relation to us.
All we got were sore eyes looking directly at the sun for too long, sporadic incidents of headaches induced by same and nausea brought about by wearing a School tie while gawping between him and said object.

Japanese scientists have proven the hitherto theory of depletion by experiment. See the photo at the top kindly posted by my scientific advisor who again must remain nameless who brought this achievement to my and a wider audiences attention.

While he was boiling his breakfast egg, (egghead!) or demarking the line to which his skimmed milk must reach to correctly enrich for taste his simply oatalicious Museli or comparable breakfast cereal is only a guess but it is this fascinating adjunct.

In releasing potassium from our bodies as an everyday occurrence we release around 5,000 neutrinos (per second) simultaneously as our own little radiation burst. Fancy that. If we all stood together and released them simultaneously and into a reflective device goodness knows we might even put another hole in the zone layer or if a double decker bus – hopefully empty see its top deck severed at the stair poles and the rest disappearing in a Cloudburst. (A good tune you will find on spotify by the way by Niagra – or perhaps the other way round – the long version is best!) so it is another mystery as to how we are our own little nuclear fusion devices but I’m sure my specialist scientific advisor will keep me across this in due course should other insights arise. Unless of course they might lead him to his very own Nobel Prize. Not entirely unlikely.

image

For this achievement to gain some (it clearly is not short of clarity of importance) I offer something which came up on the Morning Daily Service today on R4 which in pointing out our earths crust tell tales as it were on the Dorset Jurassic coast (there are even closer examples nearby to me at Larne for instance) giving us an understanding of a time wheel if not a history of exact scientific evidence as to its formation, we were reminded of the destruction initiated in Syria of the Palmyra monuments which is also attributed by some accounts to Russian bombing. These are small indictments considering the plainly inhuman aspects of killings and wanton population depletion in places like Aleppo. People cut down like wheat in the fields.

image

Reproduced from a newspaper photo by Associated Press for purely illustrative context.

Aleppo grass
Johnson grass2
—noun

a sorghum, Sorghum halepense, that spreads by creeping rhizomes, grown for fodder.
Also called Aleppo grass, Egyptian millet, Means grass.

John Graham

9 October 2015

Belfast

The views expressed are entirely my own and no inference or any connections to others is meant or intended as attributable to anyone.